Offre de Cours pour les étudiants en échange

Business

  • Management Information System

    Management Information System

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students will be able to

    Identify, model and improve business processes
    Analyze the informational dimensions of an organizations (information flux, information quality, information processing)
    Analyze the technological dimensions of an organization (technological constraints related to software, hardware, network and database issues)
    Analyze the organizational dimensions of the IT project (identify key stakeholders, describe organizational culture, find key leverages for change management)
    Formulate a plan of action for the project scope (features, business process changes, use cases)
    Formulate a plan of action for project management (communication plan, implementation plan)
    The course will also provide students with elements of IT culture relevant for future managers involved in IT Projects.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Weekly activities are required from each student, conducted in group. These assignments are graded by peers. Consequently, one of the weekly assignments is the grading of another groups’ assignment.
    At Week 6, students deliver a first version of the need’s analysis. This first deliverable is defended in front of a teacher, acting as senior consultant (20 %)
    At week 12, students deliver the final version of the functional specifications (40 %). This deliverable is defended in front of a panel of teachers, acting as the client company. The defense is attributed a grade (40 %).

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    There are no formal prerequisites. General culture on how organizations operate is welcome.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course will provide a general and practical overview of the issue of managing information systems in contemporary organizations. The course helps students analyze information systems problematics by using a multi-focal perspective on IS issues, focusing on information, technological and organizational dimensions of all IT projects. In order to do so, students will have to deal with a detailed case study, which they will have to solve in group and in 12 weeks, thanks to a sequence of activities. These activities are mostly carried out on line, the in-class hours being dedicated to answering students’ questions and framing their work.


    Course Structure

    Introduction to Management of Information Systems
    Business Process Modeling
    Business Process Reengineering
    Informational analysis
    Technological Analysis
    Organizational Analysis
    Needs Analysis
    Change Management in IT Projects
    Risk Management in IT Projects
    Privacy related issues in IT Projects
    Drafting functional specifications
    Defence.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • PIERRE LANIRAY

  • Corporate Social Responsibility

    Corporate Social Responsibility

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the Corporate Social Responsibility class offered by Paris Dauphine University students will be able to understand and critically discuss the concepts and topics of corporate social responsibility as well as business’ responsibility. They will have a comprehensive understanding of sustainability challenges (social, environmental and economic development) that companies face and how transform these challenges into business opportunities.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Examination modalities:

    Oral participation / Attendance 20%
    Group Presentation 40%
    (from course 3 to course 11)

    Final Exam 40% (course 13)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    A great motivation to know more about CSR and how it works in today’s business is sufficient to participate to this class.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    For the past 25 years, notably since the 1992 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio, companies have increasingly invested resources to appear committed to Sustainable Development.
    But where are we now? Is it more than mere window-dressing? What kind of value do sustainable practices create? This course combines a descriptive and a practical approach to the implementation of sustainable practices into an international and multi-dimensional/sectorial business environment, including description of multiple cases and concrete example from professional speakers. The first half of each class will take the form of a lecture, while the second half will consist of practical cases, group works, role playing games etc.

    Objectives:
    Provide students with a comprehensive understanding of Sustainable Development and sustainability challenges (social, economic and regulatory) companies now face (from SMEs to large international corporates). Demonstrate students that Sustainable Development, from a business perspective, is viable when integrated into a business strategy.
     

    Introduction – A History of Sustainable Development, from environmental awareness to corporate social responsibility
    The Challenges of Sustainable Development
    The Principles of Sustainable Development
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Integrating Sustainable Development in companies
    CSR and Financial Markets
    CSR and Customers
    CSR and the Supply Chain
    Enhancing its CSR approach
    Measuring CSR performance
    Creating value with Partnerships
    Creating a CSR Strategy
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    The United Nations. Millennium Development Goals Report 2015
    UNEP-FI. The Positive Impact Manifesto. 2017
    EU High-Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance – Financing a sustainable European economy – 2018
    Handbook of Research on Marketing and Corporate Social Responsibility - Edited by Ronald Paul Hill, Villanova University, US and Ryan Langan, Assistant Professor of Marketing, University of San Francisco, US
    CSR AS A Management Idea, Ethics in Action. Edited by Mats Jutterström and Peter Norberg, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden
    IFC Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability – IFC, January 2012.
    The A to Z of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Complete Reference Guide to Concepts, Codes and Organizations. Wayne Visser, Dirk Matten, Manfred Pohl, Nick Tolhurst, Katja Böhmer, Aron Ghebremariam, Judith Hennigfeld, Sandra S. Huble, 2007.
    The Oxford Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility. Crane, 2008.
    https://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/csr_guide.pdfhttps://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/csr_guide.pdf

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • CLEMENT DAMASSE
    • RAPHAEL VIALAT

  • International Marketing

    International Marketing

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objectives:
    The key topics to be covered are as follows:

    Facts and figures on globalized markets.
    Cultural diversity and its impact on buying and marketing
    Coordination of marketing activities across country markets
    Product standardization vs. price discrimination
    Best practice insights from a global marketing champion

    Learning outcomes
    Based on this course, participants will:

    Get an overview of extent of and implications from globalized markets
    Appreciate opportunities and understanding pitfalls of international marketing.
    Be able to frame and structure the challenges of and approaches to international marketing.
    Be able to define marketing strategies for a global arena
    Know how to use tools to prepare and implement marketing action across country markets

     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Grading Criteria

    Case studies and participation 30%
    Final Exam 70%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis recommandés :
    Read something
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description
    Globalization has developed from a trend into a fact. SMEs, which traditionally have been the backbone of the German economy, need to actively address the issue of business that crosses borders. To perform in an increasingly competitive international environment, companies need to understand the challenges and opportunities of globalization and act appropriately. Consequently, this module provides to managers a profound skill- and knowledge base needed for international marketing success.

    The key topics to be covered are as follows:

    - Facts and figures on globalized markets.
    - Cultural diversity and its impact on buying and marketing
    - Coordination of marketing activities across country markets
    - Product standardization vs. price discrimination
    - Best practice insights from a global marketing champion


    Course structure

    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 1/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 2/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 3/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 4/4
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (1/3)
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (2/3)
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (3/3)
    Case study 1
    Understanding competitive intelligence under the framework of international marketing
    Impact of digital revolution in international marketing (1/2)
    Impact of digital revolution in international marketing (2/2)
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    International Marketing de Pervez Ghauri (Auteur),? Philip R. Cateora (Auteur)

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Sélim ALLILI

  • Marketing of the Luxury Sector

    Marketing of the Luxury Sector

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    2. Objectives
    This class in luxury marketing aims to provide students with the main concepts, skills, know-how and benchmarks they need to enter luxury company and help develop and manage luxury brands and companies both today and in the future, in fast changing world. It is a programm that will enable participants to delve deeply into the culture of luxury in order to grasp the essence of its so specific management. The goal of this nevertheles business-oriented class is to enable participants to think the right and relevant way concerning the marketing of luxury brands worldwide in a rapidly changing luxury environment.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Grading Criteria
    Case studies 30%
    Participation 20%
    Final Exam 50%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Interest for luxury goods and services

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    1-Context
    Over the last thirty years, there has been dramatic growth within the luxury sector. Countries of high economic growth have seen corresponding booms in domestic luxury sales. This has been fed by the emergence of a new group of very rich people (high net worth individuals (HNWI) from the worlds of business, sport, art, entertainment, culture, internet ...), as well as a group of upper middle-class consumers seeking to emulate them. Today luxury no longer seems to be an exception, or a privilege, but a right for all.
    Asia in general, and China in particular, are now recognized as the biggest potential markets for luxury goods. Even when luxury sales drop in China, the fast recovery clearly demonstrates that Asian consumers love luxury items. Luxury brands are now targeting the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) and leveraging travel retail to increase their growth rates. This is a clear indicator of bright prospects for the luxury business. Luxury has aroused the interest of many corporations who see “premiumization” as a profitable strategy and of governments who recognize the exportability of the luxury sector and its role in developing soft power. However, luxury brand management is not at all the same as conventional brand management.


    Course Schedule

    Introduction and icebreaker / Presentation of assessments / • Some key facts about luxury / Group workshop on SWAROVSKI Case
    Characteristics of luxury today / Main players in Luxury Industry / Case Study : introduce a startup brand with a luxury strategy
    Small Knowledge test / Short History of Luxury / Case Study : Nespresso Case
    Premium vs Luxury / Case Study : Premium brand?
    Premium vs Luxury (end) / Case study : Car industry step in or out of luxury
    Luxury? A very specific marketing (24 antilaws)
    Case Study : Digital watches in Luxury (Heritage and Innovation)
    Small Knowledge test / Luxury Today
    The customer in Luxury / Distribution and Communication in Luxury Segment
    The Brand Equity / Case Study : Ralph Lauren Identity Prism & the Right Formula
    Final Case Presentation in Group (Graded)
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    The bibliography will be provided at the beginning of the course.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Germain BOUCHARA

  • Management Control

    Management Control

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objectives
    The course objectives are to understand and apply the basic concepts and tools of management control, that each manager may experience during his career.


    Learning outcomes
    Sessions are divided in :

    Lectures : presentation of the concepts and examples
    Case studies : they have been prepared and will be presented by a group of students
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Oral presentation weighted by participation and involvement : 20 %
    Interim test : 30%
    Final exam : 50%
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Some notions on management accounting: cost calculations, budget, variances…

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This course provides materials for a comprehensive course on management control systems (MCSs). MCSs are defined broadly to include everything managers do to help ensure that their organization’s strategies and plans are carried out or, if conditions warrant, that they are modified. Thus, the course focuses on topics related to “strategy implementation” or “execution.” While the treatment of the MCS subject is broad, the primary focus of the course is on what we call results controls, which involve motivating employees to produce the outcomes the organization wants. This type of management control, which requires performance measures and evaluations and the provision of incentives, dominates in importance in the vast majority of organizations.

    Because management control is a core function of management, all students interested in business or management can benefit from this course. However, this course should be particularly useful for those who are, or aspire to be, managers, management consultants, financial specialists (for example, controller, financial analyst, auditor), or human resource specialists (for example, personnel director, compensation consultant).


    Course Structure

    Managerial and strategic perspectives
    Loop control strategy
    How to calculate costs (part 1) + Sanilux case
    How to calculate costs (part 2) + Flycut case
    How to calculate costs (part 3) + Zeltronic case
    CVP analysis and short term decisions + Remotel case
    ROCE and performance measurement
    Setting objectives
    Building budgets
    Variance analysis
    Dashboards
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Berland, De Rongé, Contrôle de gestion. Perspectives managériales et stratégiques, Pearson
    Merchant and Van der Stede, Management Control Systems, Prentice Hall
    Giraud, Zarlowski and al, Fundamentals of Management Control, Pearson
    Horngren, Cost Accounting, a Managerial Emphasis, Prentice-Hall

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • ANNE BIZIERE

  • Principles Of Marketing

    Principles Of Marketing

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    The specific objectives of this course are the following:
    - Discover and understand the key notions and tools of marketing
    - Understand the importance of consumer insights
    - Discover the components of a marketing strategy as well as those of the marketing mix
    - Evaluate and critically analyse a marketing strategy
    - Develop a consistent marketing strategy
    - Understand current developments in the marketing discipline
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    The course evaluation will be based on:

    An individual exam (50%)
    A Marketing Team Project (35%): a presentation of a company’s marketing strategy + the critical analysis of the marketing mix elements + valuable recommendations for improvement + marketing metrics/indicators allowing to evaluate the performance
    A marketing simulation game (15%)
    Class preparation and active participation (bonus points: 5%)
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This course aims at giving a general overview of Marketing, developing its main concepts, methodologies and practices. This introductory course will provide a good basis for students who wish to pursue with a master’s in marketing, as well as those who are curious to know more about the fundamentals of this subject.
    The course will consist of theoretical lectures (class topics detailed below), enriched with in-class discussions based on exercises and analysis of appropriate case studies / examples. These concepts will be applied to an end-of-term group project as well as through a virtual simulation game.


    Course Structure

    Introduction to marketing and to the module
    Understanding consumers
    Understanding the market environment + Market research
    Marketing strategy + branding
    Marketing mix - Product and services
    Marketing mix - Communication
    Marketing mix - Distribution
    Marketing mix - Price
    Contemporary issues in marketing
    Simbrand Business Game
    Simbrand Business Game
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Kotler P. & Armstrong G.,
    Principles of Marketing. Pearson Education.

    Available in 658.8 PRI


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • DINA RASOLOFOARISON

  • Human Resources Management

    Human Resources Management

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Jeanne LE ROY

  • Strategic Management

    Strategic Management

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes

    Understand the notion of strategic management
    Ability to analyze, synthesize and anticipate the effects of strategic choices
    Ability to integrate knowledge from strategic management in problem solving in a bigger multidisciplinary setting.
    Understand the steps of an organization’s situational analysis
    Ability to think strategically about an organization, its goal, its environment, how it can increase sustainable competitive advantage and develop plans to ensure long term viability.
    Ability to select, structure and present operational data and strategic information.
    Ability to point out how doing strategy has changed because of advancing technology and globalization
    Be able to clearly explain their own perspectives and choices, and consider feedback and remarks of associates.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Class participation: 50% (Case Studies)
    Final exam: 50%
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    No specific prerequisite. Some basic notions of strategy would be preferable.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Strategic Management. This course presents the key ideas, principles and instruments, of strategy and competitive analysis. The course focus on the concept of strategy, the data, analysis, procedures, and skills used by managers to position their organizations and set up strategy in order to influence their performance and success.

    Strategic Management focuses on organizations as a whole and its interactions and exchanges with its global environment.

    The overall goals are:

    To build a framework of analysis which will allow students to analyze central issues and problem in complex cases.
    To be able to develop alternative course of action, and present well supported suggestions for future actions.
    To build up a superior understanding of the present and future conditions in which organization must function.
    To develop analytical and decision-making skills for dealing with complex issues in an ethical manner.

    Course structure

    Introduction to Strategy and elements of reflexivity
    The performance of organizations
    Levels and formulation of strategies: changing world, changing strategies
    Schools of strategy
    Strategy as a process
    Stakeholder theory
    External analysis
    Internal analysis
    Generic strategy
    Focus on sustainable development and risks: implications for strategic thinking
    Strategic implementation
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Title: Strategic management concepts and cases a competitive advantage approach
    Author: David, Fred R ; David R., Forest ;
    Publisher: Boston etc. : Pearson , copyright 2017

    Title: Foundations of strategy
    Author: Grant, Robert M ; Jordan, Judith ;
    Publisher : Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley and Sons , 2012


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse: No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • ALICE SCHOONEJANS

Economics

  • Europe : Today's challenges

    Europe : Today's challenges

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    The main aims of the seminar are to understand the
    basic notions about Europe and to acquire a good knowledge of the European economy. The object of the seminar is to gain
    a broad understanding of the European Union, its history and prospects in particular with the integration of new Member States and the different internal policies.


    Learning outcomes
    Students will know
    • the main steps in the Eu construction
    • how the EU is organized
    • how to analyze the main EU integration policies
    • how to compare the EU situation with other economic areas
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    • 1 Midterm exam – computer based exam- 2 hours
    30% AND 1 Final exam – 2 hours
    40%
    • 2 pages synthesis (writing document - max of 2 pages):
    30%
    • Participation in class and attendance

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    No specific perequisites - This class is designed for non-EU students (students coming from the EU are unfortunately not accepted)

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    The first decade of the XXIst century has been decisive for the future of Europe. Several Central and Eastern European countries as well as some Southern European countries, have integrated the European Union. Today, the EU is facing several challenges.

    The Economic and Monetary Union, the creation of the Euro zone with the settlement of the single currency within a limited but growing number of member countries have thoroughly modified the relations between the European Union and the rest of the world economy.

    The governance of the European Union is questioned with more than 25 members states. The immigration crisis raised the debate on Schengen and the fundamental freedoms.

    The European Union has long been committed to international efforts to tackle climate change and felt the duty to set an example through robust policy-making at home. The EU is actively promoting Europe’s transition to a low-carbon society, and is updating its rules in order to facilitate the necessary private and public investment in the clean energy transition. This should not only be good for the planet, but also good for the economy and good for consumers.

    During the seminar, different themes and policies will be explored among them:

    The European construction
    The European institutions
    The Economic and Monetary Union
    The European budget policy
    The European energy policy
    The European competition policy
    The external trade policy of the European Union
    The European social policy

    Course Structure:

    Introduction
    The European construction
    The European Institutions
    The Economic and Monetary Union (1)
    The Economic and Monetary Union (2)
    The European budget policy
    Midterm
    The European competition policy
    The European energy policy
    The external trade policy of the European Union
    The European social policy
    Final exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    All the lectures slides, the readings, additional information, bibliography per section,… will be posted on MyCourse.

    • European Union: http://europa.eu/index_en.htm
    • European Commission: http://ec.europa.eu/
    • European Parliament: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/
    • European council: http://www.european-council.europa.eu/the-institution.aspx?lang=en
    • Council of the EU: http://www.consilium.europa.eu/homepage.aspx?lang=en
    • Fondation Schuman : http://www.robert-schuman.eu/
    • Eurostat : http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/eurostat/home/
    • Toute l’Europe (in French):
    www.touteleurope.fr/

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • AUDE SZTULMAN
    • SOPHIE MERITET

  • Energy and climate change economics

    Energy and climate change economics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    The objectives of the course is to understand the economic issues related to energy and climate change and the main principles of the economics tools and regulations for the management.


    Learning outcomes
    Climate change issues have received increasing attention over the last years, with a huge impact on the energy systems.
    In this context, the course examines:
    • Economic theory, empirical perspectives, and political economy of energy supply and demand, both for fossil fuel and renewable sources of energy.
    • Public policies affecting energy markets including taxation, price regulation and deregulation, energy efficiency, and control of emissions.
    • A specific attention will be given to economic policies such as carbon taxes and tradable emission permits and to the problems of displacing fossil fuels with new energy technologies.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    Group presentations (50%) + final exam (50%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview :
    Climate change is mainly linked to an energy model historically based on fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas) since the first industrial revolution. Limiting the main effects of climate change (extreme weather events, air pollution, sea level growth, …) and their economic costs imply to deploy low carbon energy means (wind power, solar power, …), to improve energy efficient and, mode widely, to transform the organisation of our societies. The course addresses the main economic challenges related these transformations.


    Course Structure:

    Introduction : what do we mean by « energy transition » (1/2)
    Introduction : what do we mean by « energy transition » (2/2)
    Climate change economics : topics and tools (1/3)
    Climate change economics : topics and tools (2/3)
    Climate change economics : topics and tools (3/3)
    Implementing the Paris-Agreement : principles and challenges (1/3)
    Implementing the Paris-Agreement : principles and challenges (2/3)
    Implementing the Paris-Agreement : principles and challenges (3/3)
    World Energy Outlook 2019 : analyses and long term scenarios (1/3)
    World Energy Outlook 2019 : analyses and long term scenarios (2/3)
    World Energy Outlook 2019 : analyses and long term scenarios (3/3)
    Final exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Reading list and documents will be given in class and proposed online, on My Course, as well as course presentations. No specific textbook is required.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • PATRICE GEOFFRON

  • International Economics

    International Economics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    Being able to analyze and discuss current economic problems related to trade policy, trade integration, migration policy, the brain drain, in light of economic models. The course will be suited for students with previous background in economics, who have an interest in pursuing studies in the field.


    Learning Outcomes
    Students will be able to use an economic model to analyze, for example, the impact of a trade restriction, or of a restriction on immigration flows, on economic outcomes in the countries involved. They will be able to make the link between models and current economic problems in this domain.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Participation + written final exam

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic calculus and at least one microeconomics course. A course in international economics is a plus, but is not required.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    The class will cover topics in international economics: trade and migration. It will be broadly composed of two sections. The first, larger section is devoted to classical trade models (Ricardian model, Hecksher-Ohlin model), and their empirical application. Next, trade policy instruments and their effects are analyzed in a partial equilibrium setting. The second section is devoted to the economic analysis of migration. After an overview of the different migration regimes and flows, and of the corresponding orders of magnitude, we analyze migration in a two-factor classical framework. Next, a simple Roy-Borjas model of migrant selection is introduced. Its empirical relevance is discussed in light of recent applied research.


    Course Structure

    Overview: stylized facts on trade today and in historical perspective
    Classical trade theory: Ricardo’s comparative advantage
    Classical trade theory: factor-based models
    Trade theory continued; exercises
    Empirical tests of trade models
    Trade policy in practice: instruments, impacts ; political economy of trade.
    Trade policy in practice: case studies and empirical studies.
    International migration: introduction. Overview of size, composition, direction of main flows.
    Theoretical framework: migration in a classical two-factor, constant returns to scale model.
    Selection of migrants: a simple Roy-Borjas model. Empirical applications.
    Migrant selection continued.
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibiography
    P. Krugman, M. Melitz and M. Obstfeld:
    International Economics, 9th edition. Pearson education.
    G. Borjas,
    Immigration economics, Harvard university press.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • JOACHIM JARREAU

  • History of economic thought

    History of economic thought

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objective
    The class aims to familiarise students with the main currents in the history of economic thought embodied by their most important theorists from Aristotle to Keynes. Students having taken the class should retain, in particular, the key features of the main economic bodies of thought and their actual or potential relevance to major historical or current economic questions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Knowledge of the great currents in the history of economic thought and their principal representatives and major texts; at least cursory understanding of several basic building blocks of economic theory; some intuition for the assumptions and methodological choices that establish economics as an autonomous endeavour of research in the social sciences
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Final Exam (control of acquired notions, some multiple choice) 50 %
    Written Assignment 50% (the assigned papers can be prepared individually or in groups of two or three; the list of possible topics is attached below). The grade for the paper includes class attendance. Except for students with special exemptions, more than two unmotivated absences can lead to deductions.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of micro- and macroeconomics is desirable but not a must for students willing to familiarise themselves with a few key concepts during class.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    Following an introductory class on the methodology of economics and the conditions under which it might be considered a scientific endeavour akin to the natural sciences rather than a descriptive and hermeneutic endeavour akin to history or political science, the basic structure of the course is chronological (see plan below). Different theoretical approaches are presented in the context of their times and illustrated with simple numerical examples or diagrams that could also figure in introductory textbooks of micro- and macroeconomics. Wherever possible and pertinent, historical questions are linked to contemporary economic questions, e.g., Aristotle’s chrematistics and what constitutes a “good life”, Mandeville and the question of ethics in economics, mercantilism and modern trade disputes, the physiocrats and the question of natural resources, Ricardo and modern sources of rent, Marxism and the theory of crises, Veblen and the conspicuous consumption of leisure in the time of Facebook. Adam Smith, as the proponent of decentralised auto-organisation, the marginalists and Keynes remain, of course, directly relevant to modern economic issues in an all-pervasive and very direct manner.
    There are three further issues that might distinguish this class from other introductory classes to the history of economic thought. First, a particular emphasis is put on what we call the “economic subject”, i.e., the individual, entity, group or class, which defines the major economic issues and questions of the day and acts on them. In neoclassical economics, the economic subject is, of course, largely identical with the
    homo oeconomicus maximising individual utility. However, Aristotle, scholastic economic thought, mercantilism, the physiocrats, Marxism, institutionalism or even Keynes would have very different ideas about who constitutes the economic subject.
    Second, two classes are dedicated to Adam Smith as the founder of economics as an autonomous discipline independent of the other social sciences and a potentially scientific endeavour of research. We thus give space to the development in the
    Theory of Moral Sentiments of the anthropological foundations of the Smithian economic man, whose implications are then explored both at the micro and the macro level in the
    Wealth of Nations. This allows, in particular, a better understanding of the underlying assumptions behind the working of the invisible hand.
    Third, the class puts strong emphasis on the original writings (either in English or in English translation) of the key representatives of each current in the history of economic thought. While there are many competent historians of economic thought, nobody surpasses the writers who became “classics” in their ability to succinctly formulate ways forward out of the dilemmas posed by fundamental economic questions. Students will thus receive for each class by Email key chapters of the great economic texts as reading assignments. The decisive paragraphs will be read in class.


    Course structure

    Object and method of economic science
    Ethics, religion and economy in antiquity and the middle ages
    Moral, politics and Economics in the renaissance and mercantilism
    The political economy of the enlightened absolutism: the physiocrats
    Sympathy and wealth: Adam Smith and the
    homo oeconomicus
    Division of labour, value, and trade: Adam Smith Economist
    The classics: rent, distribution and growth in Say, Ricardo and Malthus
    Happiness or utility? The critique of liberal economy from Plato to Marx
    Individual optimization and general equilibrium: Walras and Jevons, Edgeworth and Pareto
    Increasing returns and competition in Alfred Marshall;
    Heterodox economic thinkers (Veblen, Schumpeter, Hayek)
    Keynes and the making of macroeconomics
    Final exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Object and method of economic science: Milton Friedman (1953), “The Methodology of Positive Economics” in
    Essays in Positive Economics. Karl Popper (1935),
    The Logic of Scientific Discovery, Part I “Introduction to the Logic of Science”.

    Ethics, religion and economy in antiquity and the middle ages: Plato,
    The Laws, Chapters 5 and 9. Aristotle,
    Nicomachean Ethics, Book V. Aristotle,
    Politics, Book 1, Chapters 8-12. Thomas Aquinas,
    Summa teologica, Questions 77 – 78.

    Moral, politics and Economics in the renaissance and mercantilism Thomas Hobbes (1660),
    The Leviathan, “Of the Nutrition and Procreation of A Commonwealth”. John Locke (1690),
    The Second Treatise of Civil Government, Ch. 5 “Of Property” Bernard Mandeville (1714),
    The Fable of the Bees: Or Private Vices, Public Benefits, “The Grumbling Hive: Or Knaves Turned Honest”.

    The political economy of the enlightened absolutism: the physiocrats: François Quesnay (1759),
    Economic Table.

    Sympathy and wealth: Adam Smith and the
    homo oeconomicus: Adam Smith (1759),
    The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Selected passages.

    Division of labour, value, and trade: Adam Smith Economist. Adam Smith (1776),
    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Book I “Of the Causes of Improvement in the Productive Power of Labour”.

    The classics: rent, distribution and growth in Say, Ricardo and Malthus David Ricardo (1817),
    Of the Principles of Political Economy and Trade, Chapters 1, 2 and 7 “On Value”, “On Rent” and “On Foreign Trade”.

    Happiness or utility? The critique of the liberal economy from Plato to Marx. Karl Marx (1867),
    Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Vol. I, Book I, Part 1 “Commodities and Money”

    Individual optimization and general equilibrium: Walras and Jevons, Edgeworth and Pareto. William Stanley Jevons (1871),
    Theory of Political Economy, Ch 4 “Theory of Exchange”.

    Increasing returns and competition in Alfred Marshall; Heterodox economic thinkers (Veblen, Schumpeter, Hayek): Alfred Marshall (1890),
    Principles of Economics, Book V, Ch. 12, “Equilibrium of Normal Demand and Supply, Continued, with Reference to the Law of Increasing Return”. Thorstein Veblen (1899),
    Theory of the Leisure Class, Chapters 2-4 “Pecuniary Emulation”, “Conspicuous Leisure”, “Conspicuous Consumption”.

    Keynes and the making of macroeconomics: John Maynard Keynes (1936),
    The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, Chapter 3 “The Principle of Effective Demand”.


    The class does not use a single textbook. Students, who wish to do so, can receive the teaching notes (in French) upon request. As a first point of entry, other than the original texts, are recommended the individual entries on authors, movements or concepts in
    The New Palgrave: Dictionary of Economics (1987), Edited by Peter Newman, John Eatwell and Murray Milgate, London, Macmillan. Please also use The History of economic thought Website,
    http://www.hetwebsite.net/het/; McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought,
    https://socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca/econ/ugcm/3ll3/; Online Library of Liberty: A collection of scholarly works about individual liberty and free markets, http://oll.libertyfund.org/.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • JAN-HORST KEPPLER

  • Game Theory

    Game Theory

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    We intend to present the main principles of game theory and show how they can be used to understand economic, social and political phenomena. We will introduce the main ideas behind the theory in an accessible manner rather than their mathematical expression.


    Learning Outcomes
    Game theory is a mode of reasoning that applies to all encounters between humans and deserves a place in a general liberal arts education. We provide a general presentation of the main concepts of game theoretical concepts and many applications of these concepts (with a slight bias towards economic applications).
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    50% Midterm + 50% final exam

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of microeconomics, mathematics and probabilities

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    We will cover the fundamental concepts of strategic games, extensive games with perfect information, Bayesian games and extensive games with imperfect information. We will provide illustrations from the social and behavioral sciences and examples that demonstrate how the theory may be used.

    Main Topics:
    - Building a model of interactions
    - Dominant/dominated strategies and iterated elimination of dominated strategies
    - Nash equilibrium in discrete games
    - Mixed strategies
    - Subgame perfect equilibrium
    - Imperfect information
    - Private information
    - Signaling


    Course Structure

    Introduction to strategic reasoning
    Building a model of strategic interaction
    Solving a game when rationality is common knowledge
    Nash equilibria in discrete game with 2 or 3 players
    Nash equilibria with n players
    Nash equilibria with n players
    Midterm Exam
    Randomized strategies
    Sequential games with perfect information
    Sequential games with imperfect information
    Games with private information
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    An Introduction to Game Theory, Joseph Harrington

    An Introduction to Game Theory, Martin Osborne


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • DAVID ETTINGER

  • Development Economics

    Development Economics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objectives:
    The course aims to provide an outline of the main issues underpinning development economics today, by outlining simple theory and providing extensive applied evidence from developing economies.


    Learning outcomes
    On completion of the course students will have:
    - an increased understanding of the development process and the constraints faced by developing economies.
    - an increased ability to apply economic tools to analyse problems of underdevelopment and to critically assess the economic policies of developing economies.
    - an increased ability to interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence.
    More generally, students will also improve their presentation and personal research skills.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Oral presentation (50%) + written exam (50%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    This course requires a basic understanding of economic principles.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description
    This course is an introduction to Development Economics, a subject that deals with the economic transformation of developing countries. Using a mix of simple theory and empirics, the goal is to provide a broad overview of the different topics that Development Economists work on, and a good understanding of both the challenges that developing countries face in their process of social and economic transformation and that individuals confront striving to leave poverty behind.

    Topics that will be discussed include: the meaning and measurement of economic development, growth theories, poverty and income distribution, fertility and population growth, education, health and nutrition, agriculture and land markets, labor and migration, the role of geography and institutions. Selected readings within these topics are chosen to highlight the methodologies that development economists use to study these questions and develop the analytical skills necessary to evaluate economic policy choices in developing economies.


    Course structure

    Introduction What is development? Indicators and issues
    History of thought in Development Economics
    Explaining Economic Growth
    Poverty and Vulnerability
    Inequality and Inequity
    Impact Evaluation of Development Policies and Programs
    Institutions and Development
    Population and Development
    Agriculture and Land
    Labor and Migration

    Human Capital: Education and Health
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Provided through intranet.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • MARTA MENENDEZ

  • Globalization

    Globalization

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students are able to analyze the main features of the economic globalization process but also the way such a process affects modern economic business life. The students develop also a keen analysis on anti-globalization movements and policies in order to understand the contradictory social and political movements in most OECD economies.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Active class participation is a main feature of the course’s organization. Students have to make short presentations on different issues concerning economic globalization. A final exam evaluates the students. The final exam counts for 50% of the note. Short presentations count for another 50% of the note.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    The course is open to all students from social sciences. No specific prerequisites are needed but a general culture about modern economies and the international environment are appreciated. The course is adapted to a large public of students in social sciences.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The aim of this course is to help students understand the economic globalization process and its consequences, both from an economic and political point of view. The course focuses on the determinants and the consequences of economic globalization, but also on the new growth and sustainable development challenges. It also examines the rising of anti-globalization movements and theories.


    Course Structure

    Globalization: a definition from an economic, sociological and cultural point of view / The anti-globalization movement: from Trump to Brexit and the rebirth of nationalism
    The globalization: origins and main actors / The after WW2 period. The changing 1990s. Multinational firms structure the world.
    Economic globalization and the role of the developing countries / The development of the East-West relations and the South south relations. / The 2008 Crisis
    Economic globalization and growth / Theoretical issues / The role of Foreign Direct Investment
    Poverty and world inequalities / Measuring poverty and economic development / Understanding the new world disparities
    China: the Rostow paradigm / The determinants of the Chinese growth / The importance of world economic openness
    When old growth models become history / The end of productivity gains / The end of mass consumption / The end of investment and public spending multiplier effect
    Monetary and banking globalization / The new banking empires / The monetary agreements / The global debth problem
    Migration / A new migration era / The migrants crisis
    From globalization to sustainable development / Poverty issues / Environment and the solutions for a sustainable development
    The return of the anti-globalization defenders / Perspectives and threats
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    A. Scott (2013). The limits of globalization, Routledge, 345 pages.
    D. Guthrie (2012). China and globalization, Taylor & Francis, 360 pages.
    P. Stearns (2016). Globalization in world history second edition, Routledge, 202 pages.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • BAPTISTE BIANCARDINI

  • Topics in Public Economics

    Topics in Public Economics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the main questions behind the contemporary economic policy themes reviewed in the course and the basic empirical methods used in public policy evaluation.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    The evaluation of the course will be based on continuous evaluation during the course, including class participation (40%), and the final exam (60%).The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of microeconomics and econometrics
    is absolutely necessary to be able to follow this course (equivalent to introduction to Microeconomics and Introduction to Econometrics in a standard Economics undergraduate curriculum).

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The objective of the course is to familiarize students with Public Economic Analysis, by focusing on specific topics with recent policy applications. For each theme, the theoretical analysis of public economic concepts will be linked with actual public policy applications. We will also put a specific emphasis on public policy evaluation, with a step-by-step critical analysis of the relevant empirical papers.


    Course Structure

    Introduction to Public Economics
    Public Policy Evaluation
    Externalities and regulation I: environmental externalities
    Externalities and regulation II: smoking externalities
    Public Goods
    Redistribution I: The evolution of inequalities
    Redistribution II: Traditional programs versus in-work benefits
    Health policy I: Health insurance
    Health policy II: Health policies in developing countries
    Education policy I
    Education policy II
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Main textbook

    Jonathan Gruber,
    Public Finance and Public Policy, any edition

    Additional bibliography on each topic will be given during the course.

    Textbooks corresponding to the level required in microeconomics and econometrics

    Econometrics textbooks

    C. Dougherty,
    Introduction to Econometrics, Oxford University Press, 3rd Ed., 2007

    J. Stock, M. Watson,
    Introduction to Econometrics, Pearson, 3rd Ed., 2010


    Microeconomics textbooks

    R. Pyndick, D. Rubinfeld,
    Microeconomics, Pearson, any edition

    Enseignant responsable :

    • GABRIELLE FACK

  • Data Analysis

    Data Analysis

    Ects : 3
    Volume horaire : 18
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students are able to describe and present data, to summarize different types of variables, to analyze the relation between these variables, to practice regression and prediction, to cluster and compare different groups of observations.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Active class participation is a main feature of the course’s organization. Students work independently on real datasets with data analysis software. A final exam evaluates the students. The final exam is also on computer. The final exam counts for 50% of the note. Participation counts for another 50% of the note.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge on probabilities and statistics

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The aim of this course is to introduce the basic methods in Data analysis and to help students in using these tools with different software. The course focuses on simple predictive analysis (linear regression or multidimensional analysis, factor approach, principal components approach. The courses take place in the computer lab in order to emphasize on practical aspects of data analysis.

    Course Structure

    Data visualization with a statistic software
    Descriptive statistics
    Sampling and statistical inference
    Analyzing relationships among variables
    Comparison of samples
    Regression and prediction
    Time series
    Principal components analysis
    Correspondence analysis
    Clustering
    Application
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Heumann (2016), Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis, Springer, 455 pages
    J.L. Devore (2011), Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis, 4th Edition, 944 pages
    C. Judd (2017), Data Analysis, New Edition, 366 pages
    D.S Moore (2009), Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, Freeman, 690 pages

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • BAPTISTE BIANCARDINI

Social Sciences & Law

  • Lebanon: Consociational Politics, Civil War and Resistance

    Lebanon: Consociational Politics, Civil War and Resistance

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    This course has three main objectives.
    (1) At an empirical level, it aims at giving students a solid knowledge in Lebanese history, mainly in the major violent episodes of its trajectory: the civil war (1975-1990), Israeli occupation (1982-2000), and Hezbollah’s intervention in Syria (since 2013).
    (2) The point is also to present a specific understanding of a practice of power far removed from what can be observed in Western democracies. Without being an authoritarian regime, the Lebanese political staff has always had a particular definition of ruling, a special understanding of democracy, that go beyond the usual features shared by consociational systems everywhere else in the world. This course will hence illustrate through thorough examples what the Lebanese mean by a “
    démocratie à la libanaise”.
    (3) By doing so, this course will also aim at triggering a shared reflection on theoretical concepts of political science, and a questioning of the universality of some of what western political science sees as basic elementary truths and laws in politics-in-practice.


    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of the course, the students enrolled will have an advanced understanding of
    (1) Lebanese history,
    (2) the notion of militancy in contexts of violence,
    (3) the main differences between major Islamic and jihadist movements,
    (4) a critical notion of foreign intervention, peacemaking, peacebuilding, state building, reconciliation, and transitional justice,
    (5) a good command of a particular case of consociational politics.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    The teacher will check the presence of the students enrolled in the course at every session. Grading is as follows: participation (10%) – book reports (2*30% = 60%) – final exam (40%).

    Participation covers the students’ performance in discussion during the meetings. They are expected to participate effectively, showing evidence that they have prepared carefully by doing the reading and thinking about it.
    Each student is expected to submit two
    book reports. Each paper, of 2 000 words, should not only summarize the content of the assigned text, but also—and more importantly—assess the author’s arguments critically, draw out the reading’s relevance to the themes of the course.
    The
    final exam – writing a paper on a subject chosen among two possible choices submitted by the instructor (3h exam) will take place at the end of the semester. The grading will be based on the quality of the quality of the analysis, and the relevance of the examples used to illustrate the argument.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis recommandés :
    Prerequisites
    No prerequisite required

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    In the study of state and politics in the Middle East, Lebanon is a puzzling case. The consociational distribution of power between no less than eighteen official religious sects has turned Lebanon’s politics into a zero-sum-game. As a consequence, it has prevented the emergence of a supra-sectarian authority that could be called a “state” in the Western sense of the concept.
    This institutional weakness generates a paradox. It threatens the country’s sovereignty by making it more vulnerable to regional and global powers. From a civil war (1975-1990) and the Israeli occupation of its south (1978-2000), to the relative calm of Syrian tutelage (1990-2005), regular turbulence periods since and another war with Israel (2006), the war in neighboring Syria, Lebanon gives the impression of great instability and unpredictability. The positions of its main actors often seem to answer to different, contradictory rationalities.
    But despite appearances, Lebanon remains a real subject of its own history. Its “lack of State” gives it a flexibility that can sometimes turn out to be useful to overcome political blockages. In other words, the political game in Lebanon is the product of calibrated doses of local, national, regional and international imperatives addressed through more or less rigid frames of meaning-making.
    This course aims to shed light on the submerged part of the iceberg of Lebanese politics, and to assess its significance for the country’s social and political future. As such, our aim here is to build Lebanese politics as a model and determine what it can teach us for other countries of the region (Iraq, Syria), which already present – or will soon present – some of the same social and political features as Lebanon.


    Course structure:

    Introduction: Chronological Overview/What is a Consociational Democracy?
    The Competition between Different Understandings of the “Lebanon” Concept – Groups and Actors
    The Civil War (1975-1990)
    The Pax Syriana Years (1990-2005)
    Hezbollah and the Liberation from Israeli Occupation (1978-2000)
    The 9/11 and “New Middle East” Effects
    Rafic Hariri’s Assassination and the End of Syrian Tutelage (2005-2006)
    The Israeli War of Summer 2006
    The 2006-2008 Escalade and the Rise of Sunni Jihadism
    The Events of May 2008 and their Political Consequences
    The Special Tribunal for Lebanon and Hezbollah’s Intervention in the Syrian War
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    For an introduction to the Lebanese historical and political universe, see:
    - SALIBI, Kamal,
    A
    House of Many Mansions, University of California Press, 1990, 247 p.;
    – TRABOULSI, Fawwaz,
    A History of Modern Lebanon, Pluto Press, 2012.
    They should be complemented with:
    - HANF, Theodor,
    Coexistence in Wartime Lebanon, London, Tauris, 2013, 712 p.
    - FISK, Robert,
    Pity the Nation, New York, Thunder’s Mouth Press, 2002, 752 p.
    - HAUGBOLLE, Sune
    , War and Memory in Lebanon, Cambridge University Press, 2012, 280 p.
    - SCHIFF, Ze’ev, YA’ARI, Ehoud,
    Israel’s Lebanon War, Simon and Schuster, 1985, 320 p.
    For the events of 2005 and onwards:
    - YOUNG, Michael,
    The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Simon & Schuster, 2010, 336 p.
    - BLANDFORD, Nicholas,
    Killing Mr. Lebanon, IB Tauris, 2006, 544 p.
    On Hezbollah:
    - DAHER Aurélie,
    Hezbollah. Mobilization and Power, Hurst/Oxford University Press, 2019
    – HAMZEH, Nizar,
    In the Path of Hizbullah, Syracuse University Press, 2004, 242 p.
    - NORTON, Augustus Richard,
    Hezbollah. A Short Story, Princeton University Press, 2007, 216 p.
    - PALMER HARIK, Judith,
    Hezbollah. The Changing Face of Terrorism, I.B. Tauris, 2004, 256 p.
    And for an internal presentation by the party’s vice-secretary general:
    - QASSEM, Naim,
    Hizbullah. The Story from Within, Saqi Books, 2010, 464 p.
    Lebanese news can be followed by reading the dailies (English versions):
    -
    Al-Nahar (naharnet): pro-March 14
    -
    The Daily Star: pro-March 14
    -
    al-Akhbar: pro-March 8
    -
    as-Safir: Leftist.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Aurélie DAHER

  • France, Great Britain, USA, Germany, Spain, European Union… How do we govern?

    France, Great Britain, USA, Germany, Spain, European Union… How do we govern?

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    In addition to constitutional culture, the lectures will also deal with major concepts analysis, main political regimes and public and constitutional law characteristics. The different themes will be studied with regard to recent events.
    The lecture will be divided into different parts: introduction to Constitutional Law, elaboration and protection of Constitutions, establishment and consolidation of the Rule of Law, separation of powers, role of political institutions.
    Other themes of our different political systems will also be studied in order to understand Constitutional Law and political spheres, such as the consequences of the voting systems on politics and government stability.
    Of the various topics addressed, particular emphasis should be made on the main regimes (presidential, parliamentary, « guided democracies »…) that will be considered through the studies of countries such as USA, Great Britain, France, Germany, Spain or Italy. Constitutional history, relationships between the powers, and also constitutional controls will of course be studied. The lecture will end by taking a detailed look at the politics of the European Union.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of this 36 hours of lectures, they must understand and master Constitutional Law and its main concerns.


    Assignments and grading
    Two group presentations. Each presentation will last 20 minutes and will be accompanied by a 10 page documentary record.
    Group presentation : 30%. Documentary record : 15%
    Group presentation : 30%. Documentary record : 15%
    Participation : 10%.

    A three hours composition at the end of the semester.
    Before their group presentation, the students will have to send their documentary records to the other members of the class, 3 days before the course.
    A group will have to present its work for 30 minutes and will then answer questions from the lecturer and the other members of the class, before the teacher’s lecture.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description
    The course aims to form students in constitutional issues linked to politics and current affairs.
    The course consists of class hours dedicated to providing a thorough and practical introduction for comparative constitutional law students to the history of European integration, institutions, the legislative process.


    Course structure

    1 PRESENTATION OF THE COURSE
    Distribution of the presentation’s subjects. Analyses of different cases linked to constitutional Law. Brief presentation of the course and its issues.

    2 THE CONSTITUTION
    Presentation: How to write and protect a constitution?
    Presentation: Is a constitution compulsory in guaranteeing Human rights and enhancing the rule of Law?

    3 RULE OF LAW, SEPARATION OF POWERS
    Presentation: The Rule of Law in Great Britain, the United States of America, Germany and France: comparison, opposition, inventory.
    Presentation: Federalism and decentralization.

    4 HOW THE PEOPLE CAN EXPRESS THEMSELVES
    Presentation: Referendums in Europe and USA.
    Presentation: Electoral systems in Europe and USA.

    5 PARLIAMENT
    Presentation: Spanish and German political systems: strengths and weaknesses.
    Presentation: Bicameralism in democracy.
    Presentation: Rationalizing Parliament.

    6 CONSTITUTIONAL REVIEW OF LEGISLATION
    Presentation: Constitutional review of legislation.
    Presentation: The Court System in France and the USA

    7 GREAT BRITAIN AND UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    Presentation: The Heads of the State during the past 150 years in GB and USA.
    Presentation: The Westminster system.

    8 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    Presentation: The Executive in USA.
    Presentation: The President and Congress.

    9 FRANCE
    Presentation: Cabinet instability under the Third and the Fourth Republics.
    Presentation: The French Constitutional Law of the 3rd of June 1958: causes and consequences.

    10 FRANCE
    Presentation: What are the characteristics of the regime of the Fifth Republic?
    Presentation: The French President since 1958.
    Presentation: The powers of the French Parliament since 1958.

    11 EUROPEAN UNION
    Presentation: European Union and National Constitutions.
    Presentation: The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and its effects.
    Presentation: The growing power of the European Parliament

    12
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Aalt Willem Heringa and Philip Kiiver,
    Constitutions Compared: An Introduction to Comparative Constitutional Law, Intersentia Ltd, 2012.
    Carles Boix and Susan C. Stokes,
    The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics, Oxford University Press, 2009.
    Sarah A. Binder, R. A. W. Rhodes, and Bert A. Rockman,
    The Oxford Handbook of Political Institutions, Oxford University Press, 2009.

    Ian Loveland,
    Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, and Human Rights, A Critical Introduction, Oxford University Press, 7th edition.

    Neill Nugent,
    The Government and Politics of The European Union, The European Union Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 7th edition.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Nicolas SFEZ

  • European Economic Law

    European Economic Law

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Knowledge of the main Treaty provisions and case law concerning the four market freedoms
    Understanding of the legal specificities of European market integration
    Understanding of the challenges for European and national legal orders raised by the European market integration processes
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    50% group presentation and individual class participation
    50% final written exam

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge in law (even only national) and in economics.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    European economic law focusses on the EU rules regulating the states and private firms operating in the single market. The European Economic Law course covers the central aspects of European Market Law : the four fundamental freedoms contained in the Treaty of Rome but also more recent areas of European economic integration : European tax policy, monetary and capital union. The course is interactive and encourages students to actively participate in their own and others’ learning experience, to undertake collaborative group work and personal research.

    Objectives:
    The aim of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of European economic integration and its current challenges, through an overview of the fundamental rules constructing and regulating the European internal market.

    Course Structure:

    Lecture : From the European Economic Community to the European Union / Brainstorming and group formation
    Lecture : The main institutions economic regulation :The Commission, the CJEU, The ECB / Class Presentation : The effect of Brexit on European integration
    Lecture : Free movement of workers and services /Class presentation : the case of detached workers
    Lecture: Free movement of goods and tariff barriers / Class presentation: The WTO and the common market
    Lecture: Free movement of goods and the regulation of NTBS / Class Presentation: Is free trade in the EU compatible with environmental protection?
    Lecture: Competition Law 1 / 101 TFEU and the regulation of cartels and vertical agreements / Class Presentation: Cartels in the EU
    Lecture: Competition Law 2/ Article 102 TFEU and the regulation of dominant positions / Class Presentation: The Microsoft case (art 102 TFEU) and its implications
    Lecture: Competition Law 3/ The regulation of European mergers and acquisitions / Class Presentation: The Facebook WhatsApp European merger
    Lecture: Freedom of establishment and company law harmonisation / Class Presentation: The European corporation (SE)
    Lecture: Towards a European Capital Union / Class Presentation: Free movement of capital and the Volkswagen case (2007)
    Lecture: EU Tax Policy / Class Presentation: The Apple case on tax rulings
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    http://europa.eu/european-union/index_enhttp://europa.eu/european-union/index_en
    and the institutions’ own websites
    https://www.euractiv.com/https://www.euractiv.com/
    https://www.touteleurope.eu/https://www.touteleurope.eu/
    John Fairhurst, Law of the European Union, 11/E, ISBN-10: 1292090332 • ISBN-13: 9781292090337©2016 • Pearson • Paper, 872 pp Published 05 Apr 2016
    Penelope Kent, Blueprints: EU Law, SBN-10: 1408279029 • ISBN-13: 9781408279021©2014 • Pearson • Paper, 432 p, Published 03 Jul 2014
    https://www.vitalsource.com/en-uk/referral?term=9781408279045https://www.vitalsource.com/en-uk/referral?term=9781408279045
    Iyiola Solanke, EU Law, ISBN-10: 1408228335 •Pearson • Paper, 584 pp, Published 21 May 2015,
    https://www.vitalsource.com/enhttps://www.vitalsource.com/en
    Studies in European Economic Law and Regulation, Series Editors: Purnhagen, Kai, van Zeben, Josephine, Springer

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • CORALIE RAFFENNE

  • Islam and the state. Paradigms, practice and socio-political changes

    Islam and the state. Paradigms, practice and socio-political changes

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Aurélie DAHER

Electives

  • Pop Art

    Pop Art

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    The course aims at giving keys to understanding the emergence of the Pop Art movement and its interaction with culture and society, providing students with knowledge about artists and art history in general. The course aims at enriching students' writing and speaking skills by focusing on the expression of argumentation and value judgment in an informed and critical way. The course also aims at developing students' creative skills through a visual project at the end of the semester.


    Learning Outcomes
    By the end of the course, students should have acquired in-depth knowledge about the Pop Art movement and many of its leading artists. They should be able to set its emergence in the context of other art movements or trends. Improving students' ability to describe and comment on artworks in an informed, critical way is promoted throughout the course, whether orally or in writing through class presentations and essays. A group visit to a museum and / or art gallery will enhance students' understanding of the role of these institutions.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    Class mark 50%: Oral presentations, a written class test on specific artworks, and active class participation. (More details given in class on the relative share in the marking of these various activities).
    Final exam: 50%


    Grading
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade.

    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    An intermediate level in English proficiency is recommended.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    The course focuses on the emergence and development of the Pop Art movement (1950s to 1970s) in the United Kingdom and the United States, giving background on the historical and aesthetic contexts such as the dominant art movements or social changes of the times. It will explore a selection of Pop artworks that focused on the new consumer society and its media, and used them as their subject. The materials, techniques and formal styles of their creations will be analyzed. Whether the artists chose to celebrate or criticize their newfound muse will be discussed. The course will also look at the art production associated to the Pop Art movement in other countries than the United Kingdom and the United States, as recent exhibitions (
    The World Goes Pop at The Tate Modern, or
    International Pop at the Walker Art Center) have shown a less canonized approach to Pop Art. Finally, “Pop Art” understood in its larger meaning of “Pop Culture” will allow for a brief introduction to “Pop architecture” (Archigram, for instance), or cult movies drawing on pop imagery (
    Barbarella for instance).


    Course Structure

    The origins of Pop Art - The Independent Group (Richard Hamilton - Eduardo Paolozzi) - British Pop
    Background on Abstract Expressionism in the US - Transition to Pop Art: Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg (Combines). Background on Dada and Marcel Duchamp
    Happenings - Claes Oldenburg - Jim Dine
    Tom Wesselmann (Still Lifes - Nudes) - James Rosenquist
    Andy Warhol
    Andy Warhol - Rauschenberg's silkscreens.
    Museum Visit (the content order of classes 5, 6, 7, 8 may vary depending on the setting of the date of the museum visit: more information will be given at the beginning of the semester)
    Robert Indiana - Written class test (more information given in class)
    Roy Lichtenstein - George Segal - (Duane Hanson)
    Pop Art in California: Wayne Thiebaud - Mel Ramos - Ed Ruscha - Allan D'Arcangelo
    Nouveau Réalisme in France - Global Pop - Pop culture: Archigram /
    Barbarella
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Texts by art critics and interviews of artists will be given in class or through MyCourse.
    A bibliography on Andy Warhol and on the Pop Art movement will be given through MyCourse, along with the address of the public libraries in Paris that hold the books.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • BEATRICE TROTIGNON

  • International Business Ethics

    International Business Ethics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    This course was especially designed as an accelerated learning platform for students destining themselves for a career in upper management or higher responsibilities in other fields, seeking to gain a personal understanding of the concepts and logics underpinning ethical business practices. Students will gain theoretical insight into ethical philosophies and correlate these with relevant managerial imperatives in business decisions. They will also develop a professional skill-set with ethical value orientations and a prioritization of decision parameters. This will help them better define their own ethical management style, expressing vision and a unique leadership philosophy.


    Learning Outcomes
    Students will have the opportunity to deepen their intellectual understanding of ethics, and its growing role in business organizations. They will acquire the ability to assess ethical values at work within management decisions and analyze their empowerment in business methodologies. The more advanced achievers will structure key values into the business process, and creatively combine vital organizational goals with clear ethical orientations. Most students will gain a broad understanding of the stakes of ethics in international business, and be better able to contribute responsibly to achieving future employers’ objectives in a distinctly ethical managerial capacity.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    Required case study preparation, class discussion participation and independent research.
    Graded 50% for collaborative group presentations and 50% for the individual final exam.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International students are expected to have an initial awareness of ethics in the field of business, and to be at minimum at the stage of problem finding, with respect the place of ethics in society at large, as well as in business and commerce. They aim to actively develop their understanding of ethics in management philosophy and hone their ethical business decision-making skills. They agree to participate in class debates and conduct independent research on a specific ethical topic.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This course was created to grant international students’ insight into the responsibilities incumbent to high level decision making. With theoretical learning and practical applications, it is designed to prepare business students to the ethical dimensions of careers in middle or upper management.
    Students are called upon to set their own learning objectives, as well as skill development goals. They will be expected to harness abstract concepts and apply them to practical business contexts. Teaching is through thematic lectures, focused class discussions and simulated case study debate.


    Course Structure

    Presentation of course objectives and outline of learning requirements. Introduction to value empowerment in business decision making and its relevance to management style and the development of leadership skills.
    Overview of embedded issues in international business ethics and their pertinence to business orientations and management prerogatives. Ethics in relation to law, to broader social imperatives and forms of regulation.
    Ethics quiz and discussions of ethical analysis and behavioral modeling. Theoretical overview of values, attitudes and behavioral characterization. Utility and limitations of social psychology in ethical behavioral analysis.
    Review of the larger schools of thought in ethical theory and discussion of the pros and cons of each type of logical structuring of ethical philosophy.
    The historical evolution of business ethics within corporate organizations.
    1st case study focused on ethical perceptions as characterized by prior value orientations. Discussion of situational assessments and consequent implications for ethical decision-making. Value defined image analysis.
    History of Ethics, Archaic Greek competition theory and emergence of autonomous moral philosophy. Correlation of Sophist relativism with modern competitive theory and early sources of cooperative behavior.
    Class analysis of a 2nd case with ethical reengineering within a company pursuant to class action lawsuits and loss of reputation. Discussion of the issues of ethics versus compliance in the legal context of business ethics.
    History of Ethics, investigation into the fundamental insight contributed by Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. How to determine the source of values, understand what role for virtues, and define human social organizations.
    Theoretical interpretation of Hellenic period ethics in a modern context. 3rd case study examining complex international business ethics criteria.
    Comparison of Buddhist ethics, Islamic Business Ethics, worldview definition from philosophy to ethical choice of roles and action modes. Student presentations of independent research on chosen ethical topics.
    Kantian principles of Universalizability, Duty and Respect as correlated to modern Corporate Social Responsibility and awareness of Stakeholders. Student presentations of research on chosen ethical topics.
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Christoph Lütge (ed.) - 2013 - Heidelberg: Springer.

    A Defence of Philosophical Business Ethics. Roger Crisp - 2003 - In William H. Shaw (ed.),
    Ethics at Work: Basic Readings in Business Ethics, Oxford University Press. Pp. 9–25

    Beyond Empiricism: Realizing the Ethical Mission of Management. Julian Friedland - 2012 -
    Business and Society Review 117 (3):329-356

    Institutionalization of Organizational Ethics Through Transformational Leadership. Dawn S. Carlson & Pamela L. Perrewe - 1995 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):829-838.

    The Sound of Silence – A Space for Morality? The Role of Solitude for Ethical Decision Making. Kleio Akrivou, Dimitrios Bourantas, Shenjiang Mo & Evi Papalois - 2011 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):119-133.

    Responsible Leadership in Global Business: A New Approach to Leadership and its Multi-Level Outcomes. [REVIEW] Christian Voegtlin, Moritz Patzer & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2012 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):1-16.

    Real Corporate Responsibility.
    Eric Palmer - 2004 - In John Hooker & Peter Madsen (eds.),
    International Corporate Responsibility Series. Carnegie Mellon University Press. pp. 69-84

    Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function. Michael C. Jensen - 2002 -
    Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):235-256

    Innovation and Ethics, Ethical Considerations in the Innovation Business. Yves Fassin - 2000 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):193-203

    A Right to Work and Fair Conditions of Employment. Kory Schaff - 2017 - In
    Fair Work: Ethics, Social Policy, Globalization. London: Rowman and Littlefield, Intl. pp. 41-55

    Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures. Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach - 2004 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103-119


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • RICHARD OREN

  • Culture and Practice of Entrepreneurship in the English-speaking World

    Culture and Practice of Entrepreneurship in the English-speaking World

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    The objectives are three-fold :
    1/ to enhance students’ language and communication skills
    2/ to stimulate their entrepreneurial creativity (to help them find their “inner entrepreneneur”)
    3/ to generate knowledge and expand awareness of innovative business practices today


    Learning Outcomes
    1/ Greater confidence and fluency in public speaking,
    2/ Enhanced written communication skills,
    3/ Perfect the art of live and video business pitches,
    4/ How to devise and write an appropriate business plan,
    5/ Develop business communication strategies and skills.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment

    Continuous assessment takes up 50% of the final grade: writing assignments and participation in class activities = 20%; small group presentation of start-up at the end of the semester= 20%; individual mini-presentation with minimal notes and visuals =10%.
    Final exam: 50%.
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.


    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    This course is best suited to students with B2-C2 level (upper-intermediate to proficient) in English who want to maintain and improve their level of English. Native speakers may sign up for this course but are advised that although this is a theme-based course, it has a language-acquisition dimension.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This is a general English language class with a stress on the theme of entrepreneurship and creative business ideas. The course is designed to encourage the productive and creative imput of students, who will be guided through the steps of simulating the creation of their own company, from coming up with a feasible idea to designing a business plan and pitching it to potential investors. As the course title suggests, this course also involves studying the culture and practice of entrepreneurship in English-speaking countries, but also in “emerging” countries, such as India.


    Course Schedule (12 weeks)

    1- Introduction to course
    - Pros and cons of entrepreneurship as a graduate career option
    - Ice-breaking activity: create a questionnaire to evaluate peers’ suitability for a career as a self-employed person, and then interview classmates and report back to the class on your findings

    2- Myths and media stereotypes of the entrepreneur
    - Classic theories of the entrepreneurial act: Schumpeter, Kirzner and Knight compared and contrasted. Entrepreneurship, an essentially contested concept?

    3- Current trends in start-ups: a study of 30 recent US start-ups. Class research and writing activity.

    4- Feedback on previous week’s writing activity.
    - Comparing current trends in European and US start-ups
    - Beginning the process of coming up with your own ideas and finding collaborators with complementary skills: class activity.

    5- The search for new and innovative business models in the era of Web 2.0 and beyond. Testing and applying Kevin Kelly’s theory of the eight “generative values” for business activity in the Internet age.

    6- History of and recent developments in social entrepreneurship.
    - Some recent theories and business developments in the United States: Michael Porter’s concept of “shared economic value” and his critique of CSR. The emergence of the “Benefit Corporation” as a new corporate class in the United States.

    7- Basic marketing concepts. Identifying market segments and niche markets, and developing appropriate communication strategies.
    - Web marketing and the attention economy
    - Branding: some tools to help you create a brand.
    - Class activity: re-brand an existing company, product, or service.

    8- Marketing and PR: entrepreneurs and storytelling. Self-branding.
    - Financing options.
    - Fund-raising challenge activity.
    - The pros and cons of crowd funding. Strategies for conducting an effective crowd-funding campaign.

    9- Making a business plan.
    - Pitching your idea to investors and negotiating a deal with them.
    - Pitching to incubators

    10-End-of-term students presentations and peer feedback
    11-End-of-term students presentations and peer feedback

    12-Final exam : 2 hours / Feedback from class on course.  

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Course documents and bibliography will be supplied at the beginning of the course.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • MAURICE CRONIN

  • Global Media

    Global Media

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives

    To interrogate and explore the notions of cultural globalisation
    To develop students’ skills in cultural studies
    To interrogate media modernity
    To analyse how media functions in society

    Learning Outcomes
    At the end of the class students will have a finer understanding of cultural circulations in our globalised world. They will be able to reflect critically on issues ranging from media influence to media reception, and will have a good grasp of the relations between media and migrations, global trade, consumption, cultural processes and identity production.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Students will receive two grades:
    - reaction paper (50% of the final grade)
    - final exam (50% of the final grade)

    Reaction Paper:
    Every three weeks, students will be given a choice of questions to discuss in a reaction paper. Students can choose to write more than one reaction paper throughout the semester – only the best grade of all reaction papers will be kept. Reaction papers will be 500 words maximum, and should be emailed before the class for which they are due.
    The papers should show engagement with class material and class discussion.
    Due dates will be week 4, week 7, and week 10.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    The class will seek to interrogate today’s global fabrication, circulations and consumption of media, and its impact on the creation of identities. We will explore concerns about the globalised homogenisation of media cultures, the survival of indigenous cultures, the activities and processes of cultural
    bricolage and creolisation (Hannerz). We will analyse issues related to industrial concentration of media power, but also processes of decentralisation, (g)localisation, and media protectionism. With examples and case-studies of media fabrication and media consumption drawn from various cultures around the world, the class will seek to understand the links between the circulation of global images together with the circulation of goods, capital, people (diaspora) — and its roles in the fabrication of both global and local identities. The issues discussed behind the circulation of images will touch on economics, politics, cultural studies, anthropology, and development studies, to explore the power configurations at work behind the global circulation of media. Is there a nascent global imaginary, is the world fragmenting at dizzying speed in multiple and constantly re-negotiated
    mediascapes (Appadurai) – or is global media continuously being repurposed in endless localized processes of identity production?


    Course Schedule (12 weeks)

    1 The global media village? Media, culture, societies
    2 Global culture industries: concentration, market power, free trade
    3 The global culture industries and the developing world: Bollywood, Nollywood, empowerment
    4 Consuming the global: homogeneity vs. creolisation
    5 Consuming global media: social media in localized contexts
    6 Global Media Events
    7 Decolonizing global media: markets, diversity, media narratives
    8 Mediascapes: media in global circulation (Media in diaspora)
    9 Global Media, local identities
    10 The politics of global media representations
    11 Global Imaginaries
    12
    Exam
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Ulf Hannerz.
    Cultural Complexity: Studies in the Social Organization of Meaning. Columbia University Press, 1992.
    Arjun Appadurai,
    Modernity at large: the cultural dimensions of globalisation, University of Minnesota Press, 1996.
    Hall, Stuart (1997). Representation: cultural representations and signifying practices. Sage, 1997
    Homi Bhabha,
    The location of culture, Psychology Press, 1992.


    A list of readings will be provided for each seminar session.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • FABRICE LYCZBA

  • Opportunites and challenges for journalism

    Opportunites and challenges for journalism

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    Give an overview about differences in media culture of different european countries, special focus on french and European media. Preparing students to understand differences and similarities of today's media. Provide skills that serve producing own contributions or apply for an internship.


    Learning Outcomes
    General knowledge about journalism and media.
    Enrichment of vocabulary linked to press/media.
    Working on subjects in a group/redaction.
    Preparation for internship or own journalistic contributions.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Different oral and writing exercises during the semester (70%) and final written exam of 2h. (30%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic level for english conversations and writing abilities. Interest in international media and the profession of journalism. Team spirit.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    Theoretical and practical approach to the profession of journalism. History and present challenges of press with special focus on France and Europe. Exercises to acquire knowledge about journalistic work in different media (TV, web, print, radio). Development of abilities in writing, reading, and expression referred to journalism: practical exercises, discussions, vocabulary lists, interviews, development of a carrier in press.


    Course Schedule (12 weeks)

    Introduction to journalism in general (specificities of french media, history of french press and journalism school system). What is a media - and are "the media" something different?
    Different genres and important players in the international and European media world. Discover, identify and differentiate current genres and styles in the media (print, web, radio and audiovisual) through examples from international news.
    Crisis and chances. Are print media and radio declining? What social media changed in daily work for journalists. What are the chances of changing conditions for journalists?
    Requirements for successful research and the basics for daily journalistic work. How to prepare an interview and structure informations. Make mind maps for several subjects; find the required information; Broad or precise questions - the best approach to the interviewee. Working on an interview about a concrete subject and exhaust it according to your needs.
    Print press and its specifies: writing articles: Faults to avoid; practical advice along different stlye exercises. shorten and expand a text.Use imagination: quotes, word games, humor etc.
    Focus on audiovisual media. Which competences to acquire, which differences, how to prepare a successful carrier in audiovisual media, technical requirements.
    Focus on web journalism. How to work in an online redaction/ How to design the cooperation with print, how do they work together, what can they learn from each other?
    How to become a correspondent abroad (part I)? The challenges of daily work on the spot, the research of the subjects and the presentation for the public in his country of origin (between clichés and unknown facts.)
    How to become a correspondent abroad (part II)? How to create a useful network abroad. How to stay in touch with origin country. Specifies of work as f. ex. war reporter, photojournalist.
    How to apply for an internship, a job offer and how to propose a contribution to a media. Developing a well working curriculum vitae for journalists.
    Freelance journalism versus traditional redactions. Advantages and inconveniences. Self marketing in social networks and conditions to create a cooperate identity as freelancer. Create a network, stay in touch develop an address book.
    Evaluation of results - open session to deepen favorite session.

     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    - http://www.storybasedinquiry.com (Free Download)
    (Story-Based Inquiry: A Manual for Investigative Journalists und Global Investigative Journalism Casebook)
    - Articles, emissions and radio features belonging to actual subjects up to actuality handed out in the beginning of each class.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • ROMY STRASSENBURG

  • Cross-cultural Communication and Management

    Cross-cultural Communication and Management

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    We are aiming at a better understanding and awareness of what makes cultures (national and sub-cultures).
    This is a course that prepares our students for their future in any multi-cultural environment. Students who have either taken up positions in new cultures or who have pursued their studies abroad have shown their appreciation of how this course has provided them with cross-cultural insights, analytical tools and above all with confidence in their own ability to survive in a world of strange “otherness “.
    To help the student develop a new way of approaching other national and sub-cultures, so that they can manage multi-cultural teams effectively.
    To help students develop captors that will allow them to predict and iron out cross-cultural misunderstandings.


    Learning Outcomes
    By stepping back and looking at their own culture through the prisms of other cultures, students will learn how to adjust their levels of communication to others.
    This course will moreover, provide students with knowledge and understanding of other cultures that will enable them not only to survive in a large variety of multi-cultural environments, but also to manage teams made up of either a culture that is foreign to them or of mixed-cultures.
    Students will develop tools, which will help them understand what motivates group behaviour. They will also be more comfortable when presenting their work projects to a foreign audience and for instance, when negotiating in foreign countires / a multi-cultural environment.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    Continuous Assessment will make up 50% of the total marks and the final exam the other 50%.
    Continuous Assessment comprises participation in class, a group presentation, and a written assignment.


    Grading
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade.

    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and be prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International exchange students or Dauphine students fluent in English or with a very minimum of an upper-intermediate level.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This is not a course about “dos” and “don’ts”. It is first and foremost about finding out about our own behaviours and about how other cultures see us. It involves stepping back from our own vision of things and trying to look at the world through a multitude of other lenses.
    Cultures and cultural change do not just “pop” out of thin air. This course seeks to delve deep into the origins of variations in intercultural behaviour in a wide range of contexts (e.g. related to business, management, finance, psychology, sociology, geo-political, economic and legal issues etc.).
    We will be covering behaviours from cultures (and sub-cultures) around the globe from the Americas to Europe to Asia. In one module we will explore how the beginnings of Arab culture could help explain problems today. The course will also be largely focussed on Asian cultures (China, India, Japan and Singapore especially).
    Additionally, there is a tailor-made side to this course, which will encourage students to choose subjects for their written assignments that they have either always wished to explore or that will help them in their future projects.
    Students will be provided with both hard and soft copies of a variety of subjects to read for homework.


    Course Schedule (12 weeks)

    Classwork: 1) Course Logistics explained 2). ‘Getting to know you.’ 3) What is Culture?
    HW for next class: Read pack on Categorising Cultures
    Student presentation. Classwork:
    Categorising Cultures – Hall, Hofstede, Trompenaars and Philippe d’Iribarne
    HW for next class: read pack on Individualism and Collectivism.
    Student presentation. Classwork:
    Individualism and Collectivism;
    Education and Upbringing seen cross-culturally
    HW for next class: prepare for Quality of Life class test.
    Class test/discussion on
    Quality of Life-How leisure, work, food, alcohol, medication, corruption, seduction are perceived within different cultures- Group work on articles
    HW for next class: begin to prepare for your Written Assignment.
    Student presentation. Classwork:
    Islam Classwork: Begin
    Time seen cross-culturally
    No HW for next class: read Space Pack for class discussion and group activites
    Student presentation. Classwork: Finish
    Time seen cross-culturally and start
    Space HW for next class: prepare for Ethics of Eating seen cross-culturally
    Student presentation and Guest speaker presentation Classwork:
    Ethics of Eating HW for next class: prepare for India and China.
    Special Presentation by students Classwork:
    India and China HW for next class: read Origins of Culture pack.
    Special Presentation by students Classwork:
    Origins of Culture – Part 1
    HW for next class: read Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication pack.
    Special Presentation by students. Classwork:
    Origins of Culture – Part 2. Classwork:
    Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication Part 1

    No student presentation
    Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication Part 2

    EXAMEN

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    No prescribed book. Soft /hard copies will be distributed. You will be able to borrow books from your course teacher from a vast collection of works on all the subjects dealt with in class.

    “When Cultures Collide” by Richard Lewis (Nicholas Brealey International, 2006)
    “Cultures Consequences” and other books by Geert Hofstede (Sage Publication 1984).
    “Riding the Waves of Culture” and other books by Trompenaars (Mc Graw Hill, 2012)

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • MAYA PUTOIS

  • Capstone

    Capstone

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    By the end of the seminar students will be able to clearly articulate their research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.


    Learning Outcomes

    To improve skills in writing, oral presentation and research
    To recognize, explain, and juxtapose academic arguments within the context of students’ own research
    To evaluate competing positions in academic debates and to use evidence-based arguments to develop and defend their own position
    To conduct and respond to criticism through peer-review.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Capstone project is graded according to norms of academic quality.

    Assignment # 1 : 15%
    Assignment # 2 : 10%
    Assignment # 3 : 10%
    Assignment # 4 : 15%
    Assignment # 5 : 50%

    Percentages could be changed after discussion with home universities.

    Capstone products are mainly conducted in English, yet students with a good ability in French can, on a case by case basis, conduct the project in French (if accepted by the home institutions).

    Capstone projects can be focused on an academic research topic, a firm project, a university question.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Students are required to work in small groups, advised by a specialist, in order to conduct a high-quality research project. Depending on the project's complexity, students will work individually or in small teams on a problem statement (in coordination with home universities).

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    The Capstone is defined as a client-oriented group research project, based on original field research which generates a deliverable product. The Capstone project is designed to demonstrate students accumulated training in a single original project, subject to the instructor’s approval and under the additional supervision of a faculty mentor.
    Although the most common way of completing this course is the writing of a research thesis of approximately 8000 words, alternate projects can be explored in consultation with the instructor of the course (and home universities).
    The completed thesis or project should bring together a theme, a region, a foreign language expertise (sometime), and an overseas experience (most of the time). The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from the instructor, peers and mentor.


    Course Schedule (over 12 weeks):
    There is one class meeting at the beginning of the semester to explain the organization.

    Week 3: Assignment # 1: Proposal.
    The outline should address the following: (1) your thesis topic – choose a preliminary topic; (2) why your topic is important; and (3) why you should be the one to write this project.

    Week 5: Assignment # 2: Expanded & Revised Research Statement
    This assignment should introduce the reader to the main aspects of your thesis and formulate your research questions. It should set the stage for the next phase of your thesis in the following manner: State what the project is about, what you hope to demonstrate, the significance of the project, how did this idea come about (optional), what kind of sources / theoretical framework will you be using to analyze your questions (also provide a preliminary evaluation of the sources you will be using), introduce a preliminary plan of your study including an initial division into sections/chapters.
    Length: 750-1000 words.

    Week 7: Assignment # 3: Literature Review / Theoretical Background if relevant .
    This assignment may draw from the content of your proposal but it has to be significantly expanded upon feedback received. Having compiled and read the appropriate bibliography, or most of it, you should now be able to provide the background for your topic, applying broad and narrow perspectives. Some of the questions that should guide you when you are researching/compiling your literature review are: 1. What has been done thus far in the field? 2. Do you see any trends or shifts in the study of your topic? 3. What methodologies and approaches were applied? For example, the issue was handled by such and such in his work… where he explored x (but not y); … there’s a lacuna here and there; scholars relied too much on statistical analysis and less on oral testimonies; used theory a but not b; ignored or over-emphasized a comparative analysis, used one group/type of sources but not another, did or did not account for the bias in the sources used, etc. etc.
    Length: 1500-2000 words.

    Week 9: Assignment # 4: Case Study/Analysis of your data
    Here you provide all the details of your actual study. This is the part of the thesis you will be most familiar with. Analyze and discuss your data in relation to the main question you proposed and taking into consideration the literature you discussed and juxtaposed in your Literature Review. This is the part of your thesis that you zoom in the actual region/country/area you are interested in and discuss the relevance of the data in broader questions. We will discuss this assignment further in class.
    Length: 2000-2500 words.

    Week 11: Complete Rough Draft with Conclusions and an Executive Summary. Although this is not the final product, treat the rough draft as if it were. Structure your paper with titled sections, integrating your previous assignments into a single essay, expanding and altering them as needed. Pay attention also to editorial concerns (style, footnotes, etc., per our Style Sheet). In your conclusion, summarize the major points of the thesis, reflect upon relevant parts from the literature review, and indicate, if applicable, recommendations for further inquiry, be it of a scholarly or policy-related nature.
    No compulsory: Project presentation. You are required to submit an abstract to present your project. Plan a 15-minute talk, guiding the audience through the contents of your work. Pay attention to form and style. Your presentation should be professional, informative, clear and concise. The time and date of the oral presentation will be decided with the tutor, instructor and students.

    Week12: Assignment # 5: Final Paper with revised conclusions and executive summary. You should revise your rough draft several times before submitting the final version. Historically, poor marks occurred mostly because students did not heed to the advice and comments on the rough drafts. Your final paper should be professional and ready for publication.
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse :
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • SOPHIE MERITET

  • Sports

    Sports

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 18
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objectives
    Allow students to integrate sport into their university curriculum at Dauphine, regardless of their department. Teachers in each activity will provide you with:
    • Theoretical content;
    • Physical content through the practice of a physical activity.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    You will be evaluated, in each activity, through the following areas:

    Your physical performance (continuous or final exam depending on the activity);
    The knowledge provided by the teacher during the course (evaluation in the form of a file and knowledge testing at the end of the semester);
    Your progress and your commitment.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Students can attend sport practice and get credits for this class. Students will need to have their home institution’s authorization to transfer credits and register for these classes.

    Students can register for one of the following sports:
    • Badminton (mixed)
    • Basketball (mixed)
    • French boxing (mixed)
    • Coaching form (mixed)
    • Dance (mixed)
    • Climbing (mixed)
    • Football (women)
    • Football (men)
    • Golf (mixed)
    • Handball (mixed)
    • Bodybuilding (mixed)
    • Rugby (women)
    • Rugby (men)
    • Step (mixed)
    • Tennis (mixed) – minimum level required
    • Table tennis (mixed)
    • Volleyball (mixed)
    • Mountain bike (mixed)

    Students will have to contact the Athletics & Recreation Department (UAPS) to register for a specific sport at the beginning of the semester:
    • Go to the secretary of the U.A.P.S to choose a physical activity and sport, with a schedule that suits you (limited places, no registration by email or phone).
    • Return to the International Affairs office to validate your registration definitively.

    Courses take place 1h30 per week, attendance is mandatory (each absence is considered in the evaluation).
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
  • Multicultural France

    Multicultural France

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Students will get an opportunity to have a deeper understanding of multiculturalism in the French context and to compare it with other multicultural contexts.
    By attending this course, students will widen their cultural horizon and knowledge of France. By analysing French cultural productions (literary extracts, visual arts, music), they will also sharpen their critical eye while the various exercises done in class – oral presentations, essay writing with peer-review workshop, debates – will help them improve their public speaking skills and formal writing skills.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Final exam: 50%
    An oral presentation: 25%
    Essay: 25%
    Participation in class will also be taken into account for final grading.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Students who will have read/watched/studied a substantial amount of the references mentioned in the bibliography will find it easier to understand the works examined in class.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    After France won the FIFA World Cup in 1998, the slogan “Black, Blanc, Beur” emerged as a sign of the country’s alleged “harmonious multiculturalism”. About 20 years later, and despite France winning the World Cup again in 2018, things have considerably soured with intense debates going on in France about French secularism, amalgamation between Islam and terrorism, anti-Semitic acts, etc. The riots in French banlieues in 2005 and the emergence of the “Indigènes de la République” have come to symbolise, among others, the failure of a certain idea of French multiculturalism and were interpreted as a sign of French “colonial aphasia” (Ann Stoler). What does France look like in 2019? Such questions and themes will be tackled through the analysis of contemporary French cultural productions.


    Course structure

    Introduction to “Multicultural France”
    “Black, Blanc, Beur”: French Colonial History and Postcolonial identities in/of France
    “Barbès, Marseilles, and the French overseas territories": France and its multicultural territories
    "Sports, Food, Music": Various Aspects of Multicultural France
    Multiculturalism and Secularism: the French Idea of “laïcité”
    The French "banlieue film" 1: "La Haine" (1995)
    The French "banlieue film" 2 : "Divines" (2016) / Multiculturalism and Feminism
    French: one language or several languages?
    Francophonie, Francophone Literature, Beur Literature, Urban literature: Problematic Categories?
    The recent “migration crisis” in France: Building a New French Multiculturalism?
    Towards a Global History of France
    Final Exam

    The object of this class is to delve into contemporary, multicultural France, observe aspects of it through the lens of cultural productions, such as literature, cinema, documentaries, etc., and analyse them in the light of scientific articles by historians such as Nicolas Bancel or Pap Ndiaye.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Literature :
    Cf. Alain Mabanckou, Leonora Miano, Assia Djebbar, Leila Sebbar, etc.
    - Maryse Condé,
    Crossing the Mangrove (
    Traversée de la mangrove), 1989.
    - Faiza Guène,
    Just Like Tomorrow (
    Kiffe Kiffe demain), 2004.
    Extracts may be studied in class.

    Non fiction :
    -Aïssa Maïga, Sonia Rolland (and 14 other Black actresses),
    Noire n’est pas mon métier, Paris: Seuil, 2018.
    - Music :
    IAM,
    L’école du micro d’argent, 1997.
    Casey,
    Tragédie d’une trajectoire, 2006.
    La Rumeur, etc.


    History/Theory :
    - Nicolas Bancel, Pascal Blanchard, Françoise Vergès,
    La Colonisation française, Milan "Les Essentiels", 2007.
    - Patrick Boucheron (dir.),
    Histoire mondiale de la France, Paris : Seuil, 2017.
    - Hafid Gafaiti, “Nationalism, colonialism, and ethnic discourse in the construction of French Identity”, in Tylor Stovall and Georges van den Abbeele (eds),
    French Civilization and its Discontents. Nationalism, colonialism, race. Lanham etc., Lexington books, 2003, pp. 189-212.
    - Moller S. Okin (editors: J. Cohen, M. Howard and M.C. Nussbaum). 1999a. “Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?” Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp 7-27.
    - Mireille Rosello, “Tactical universalism and new multiculturalist claims in postcolonial France”, in Charles Forsdick and David Murphy (eds),
    Francophone Postcolonial Studies. A Critical Introduction, London, Arnold, 2003. pp. 135-144.
    - Kathryn Kleppinger and Laura Reeck (eds.),
    Post-Migratory Cultures in Postcolonial France, Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 2018.

    Movies :
    - Mathieu Kassovitz,
    La Haine, 1995
    - Jean-François Richet,
    Ma 6-T va crack-er, 1996
    - Laurent Cantet,
    The Class (Entre les murs), 2008
    - Céline Sciamma,
    Girlhood (Bande de filles), 2014
    - Houda Benyamina,
    Divines, 2016

    Documentaries :
    - Karim Miské, Mohamed Joseph, Pascal Blanchard,
    Musulmans de France, 2009.
    - Hélène Milano,
    Les roses noires, 2011 (on being a teenage girl in a French “banlieue”).
    - Juan Géla, Pascal Blanchard,
    Noirs de France, 2012.
    - Fatima Sissani,
    Les Gracieuses, 2014.
    - Olivier Babinet,
    Swagger, 2016.
    - Amandine Gay,
    Ouvrir la voix, 2017.
    - Daniel Cattier, Juan Gela, Fanny Glissant,
    Les Routes de l’esclavage, 2018.

    The DVDs of the movies and documentaries which will be studied in class will be circulated from the beginning of the semester.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes

    Enseignant responsable :

    • JAINE CHEMMACHERY

  • Company Culture

    Company Culture

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Students will have the opportunity to structure their understanding of culture, and its increasing impact on organizational development with potential extension to mainstream society. They will acquire the ability to assess the incidence of cultural values on business orientations and analyze their correlation to management styles. Students will explore how culture is redefining today’s business horizon as well as societal lifestyles. They will also learn how they can contribute to company objectives through cultural values with a distinctive managerial outlook.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Required case study preparation, class discussion participation and independent research.
    Graded 50% for collaborative group presentations and 50% for the individual final exam.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on personal investment and quality of comments.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International students are expected to have an initial awareness of culture in the field of business, and to have preliminary insight about what constitutes culture in companies, and in their products and services. They will endeavor to actively develop their understanding of the place of culture in management practices and to deepen their insight into the presence of culture in organizations and society. They agree to participate in class debates and conduct independent research on a topic pertaining to company culture.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course was designed for students destined for a career in international management and seeking to gain a personal understanding of the logics behind the cultural aspects of business practices. The teaching aims to broaden students’ perspectives, and enhance their ability to harness abstract cultural concepts and apply them to practical business contexts. This will deepen their understanding of the cultural dimension of business organizations in the light of related managerial considerations. Theoretical analysis and practical applications will prepare students to marketing management issues and organizational development choices. From the structuring of corporate identity to the design of brand image, students will learn about the cultural components of business activities. Teaching is done through thematic lectures, focused class discussions and simulated case study debates.

    Students will gain practical insight into what constitutes culture and will correlate this with the relevant managerial imperatives of business development. They will work on defining the parameters of their own management philosophy, expressing a unique cultural vision. They will also develop a professional skillset with cultural value orientations and the ability to focus business activity around cultural prerogatives. This aims to enhance their propensity to manage and develop company culture through selected key values.


    Course Structure

    Presentation of course objectives and outline of learning requirements. Introduction to the presence of culture within business organizations and in products and services. Questions and answers session and correlation of student motivations to relevant course content.
    Development of student understanding of the nature of culture and its modes of retention, orientation and propagation. Overview of culture within society and the arts, and which aspects also pertain to the problem sets of economic process and business organizations.
    Analysis of cultural components entering into individual identification and social group processes. Culture will be examined as the bonding agent for multiple social actors. It will also be studied as creating and maintaining the reality construct used for their interactions.
    Review of the place of culture in philosophy, ethnology, social science and psychology. Outlook onto the historical evolution of culture within business and management science.
    1st case study focused on cultural perceptions and mandates as they correlate to socioeconomic contexts and value orientations. Discussion of situational assessments and the consequent implications for company interactions involving cultural considerations.
    Panorama of company cultures with analysis of their respective goals and orientations. Comparison of various cultural models and the evolution of company culture in contemporary businesses. Exploration of competing trends and future developments.
    Class analysis of a 2nd case with cultural engineering within a company. Discussion of the role of culture in management and limits of social engineering for business performance.
    Review of culture in relation to intellectual development and human or artificial intelligence. Culture in cognitive processes, civilizational structuring through culture, historical extension of cultural traditions and practices, in which today companies partake.
    The design of company culture from business models to policy-making. Study of the potential of culture to create company dynamics and alternative methods for value creation and performance achievement, correlation of company goals with cultural options.
    Student presentations of independent research on company culture topics.
    Student presentations of independent research on company culture topics.
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Organizational Culture and Leadership. Edgard H. Schein - 1985 - Jossey-Bass.

    Living with Multiple Paradigms: The Case of Paradigm Interplay in Organizational Culture Studies. Schultz, Majken, and Mary Jo Hatch - 1996 - Academy of Management Review 21.2 (1996): 529–557.

    Impact of Organizational Culture on Organizational Performance: An Overview. F. Shahzad, A. Luqman, R. Khan & L. Shabbir - 2012 – I
    nterdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business 3 (9), 975 - 985

    Organizational Culture and its Impact on Employee Performance. R. Durgadevi & V. Shanmugan - 2017 -
    Journal of Public Health Research and Development, 8 (2), 315

    Connection Culture: The Competitive Advantage of Shared Identity, Empathy, and Understanding at Work. Michael Lee Stallard, Jason Pankau. Katharine P. Stallard - 2015 - Association for Talent Development.

    What Silicon Valley Gets Wrong (and Right) About Culture. Jay Rao - 2018 - Quartz at Work.

    Culture That Rocks: How to Revolutionize Your Company’s Culture. Jim Knight - 2014 - Knight Speaker LLC.


    MyCourse

    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • RICHARD OREN

  • Management Technologies

    Management Technologies

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Students will take the opportunity to explore how technologies and emerging artificial intelligence can bring significant change to company design and the organization of business processes. They will gain perspective on the incidence of technological change on business challenges and opportunities and will analyze their correlation to management practices. Students will also explore how technology has been modifying the business landscape and promotes innovative business-to-business and consumer models.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Required case study preparation, class discussion participation and independent research.
    Graded 50% for collaborative group presentations and 50% for the individual final exam.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on personal investment and quality of comments.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International students are expected to have an initial awareness of technology in the field of business, whether in the form of computerization and automation, or systems dependent management methods. They are to have preliminary insight about how technology intervenes within companies, in business operations and the creation of products and services. They will endeavor to actively develop their understanding of the role of technology in management practices and perspectives. They will participate in class debates and conduct independent research on a specific topic related to management technologies.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course was designed for students seeking to develop their understanding of how technology impacts business practices. It addresses the theoretical underpinnings and the technological constructs of traditional, contemporary, and future-oriented management processes. The relationship between the business process and its technical extensions will be explored in its various facets. Class sessions will address from a technological perspective the following aspects of company creation: the conception of business models, organizational design, management methodologies, and the structuring of business systems. Examined in historical perspective, management process will be correlated to various contextual economic, social, philosophical and technological environments. The redefined balance between humans and technology will also be studied. This course will finally investigate emerging management approaches, integrating recent advances in artificial intelligence and their potential contributions to company design and business performance.

    The teaching aims to extend student insight, and enhance their ability to correlate compartments of intelligence encapsulated in technology with broader concepts applied to practical business contexts. Deepening their understanding of the technological dimension of business organizations, the course will explore how software, hardware and broader systems can leverage performance and lead to entirely new competitive considerations. Business development potential and future-oriented prospective will conclude the study. Teaching is through thematic lectures, focused class discussions and simulated case study debates.


    Course Structure

    Presentation of course objectives and outline of learning requirements. Overview of the gradual emergence of intellectual property and patented technology in business activity. Exploration of concepts about technology, the integration of processes, and leveraging.
    Pre-industrial technologies will be studied with their relevance to the history of technology and a renewed interest in their benefits within luxury segments and traditional productions. Evaluation of the cost-benefit relationship of technological advances and their alternatives.
    Study of the relation between management processes and technologies. Examination of the progressive integration of artisanal business operations into business systems and management science. Prospective on the role of technology in business organizations.
    Review of business systems as used in contemporary companies. Analysis of their conceptual orientations and the cost-benefit ratios of various degrees of technological intensification. Referencing of systems design and IT support for managerial processes.
    1st case study focused on business applications of new technologies. Discussion of situational assessments and consequent implications for technological implementation and business orientations. Debate on alternative options and technological empowerment.
    Study of business methods and management practices respective to the presence of key technologies. Analysis of performance orientations and chosen means to achieve them. Evaluation of management prerogatives and respective roles of managers and systems.
    Class analysis of a 2nd case with technological change within a company pursuant to substantial modification of the competitive context. Discussion of the issues of redefining the business process in light of new tech and using change to develop new opportunities.
    Examination of the role of computers and robotics in various fields of management and business operations. Study of technologies used to integrate companies to their markets. Evaluation of technologies in redefining functional management organization and controls.
    Review of technologies that may in the future call into question management paradigms. Civilizational modification through technology and the growing role of artificial intelligence. Prospective on the future of management technology in an integrated business network.
    Student presentations of independent research on management technologies topics.
    Student presentations of independent research on management technologies topics.
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Process Innovation: Reengineering Work Through Information Technology. Thomas H. Davenport - 1993 - Harvard Business School Press, p. 326.

    Business Process Change: A Manager’s Guide to Improving, Redesigning, and Automating Processes. Paul Harmon - 2003 - Morgan Kaufmann

    Process Mapping, Process Improvement and Process Management. Dan Madison - 2005 - Paton Professional.

    Digital to the Core: Remastering Leadership for Your Industry, Your Enterprise, and Yourself. Mark Raskino, Graham Waller - 2015 - Bibliomotion, Incorporated.

    Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence: Artificial Intelligence in Finance. Open Research Platform www.frontiersin.org

    The Black Box Society: The Hidden Algorithms that Control Money and Information. Frank Pasquale - 2015 – Harvard University Press.

    The Industries of the Future. Alec Ross - 2017 - Simon & Schuster.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • RICHARD OREN

French as a Foreign Language

  • Séminaire Intensif de Français Septembre

    Séminaire Intensif de Français Septembre

    Ects : 3
    Volume horaire : 20
    Compétence à acquérir :
    A la fin du séminaire, les étudiants ont découvert ou consolidé leurs bases en langue française. Ces bases leur permettent de mieux appréhender leur semestre ou année en France.


    Learning Outcomes At the end of the seminar, students have discovered or consolidated their basis in French. These basis allow them to be better prepared for their semester or year in France.

     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Les enseignants évaluent le niveau et la participation des étudiants tout au long de la semaine puis grâce à un test final le dernier jour.


    Notation
    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale.
    Participation en classe: Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.
    Politique d'examen: Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.


    Mode of Assessment Teachers evaluate the level and participation of students throughout the week and through a final test on the last day.
    Grading The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade.
    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.
    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Academic integrity Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     
    Pré-requis recommandés :
    Les étudiants doivent passer un test de langue en ligne ou attester de leur niveau en présentant un certificat.


    Prerequisites Students must take an online language test or certify their level by presenting a certificate.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Les étudiants travailleront toutes les compétences (production orale, production écrite, compréhension orale, compréhension écrite, interaction) à l’aide de documents authentiques de différentes natures (documents sonores, vidéos, articles…).
    Le séminaire se déroule sur 5 demi-journées, à raison de 4 heures par jour. Des exercices sont également à faire entre les cours. Un examen final permet de valider le niveau de l’étudiant.
    Le séminaire se déroule en groupe de 15 étudiants maximum, par niveau allant de débutant jusqu’à C1.


    Objectifs du cours
    Ce séminaire intensif a pour objectif de préparer les étudiants à leur semestre à Paris, par un apprentissage du français adapté à leur niveau. Débutants ou avancés, ils apprendront à communiquer, à l’écrit comme à l’oral, dans des situations du quotidien, en allant de la présentation au débat d’idées.
    Ce cours leur permettra de comprendre les codes de la société française et leur donnera les moyens linguistiques de prendre part à la vie quotidienne en France.


    Overview The students will work all the skills - oral production, written production, listening comprehension, written comprehension, interaction - using authentic documents of different natures (sound documents, videos, articles ...).
    The seminar takes place over 5 half-days, for 4 hours a day. Exercises are also to be done between classes. A final exam validates the level of the student at the end of the seminar.
    The seminar is organized in groups of up to 15 students per level from beginner to C1.


    Course Objectives This intensive seminar aims at preparing students for their semester in Paris, by learning French adapted to their level. Beginners or advanced, they will learn to communicate, in written as well as oral, in everyday situations, from presentation to debate ideas.
    This course will allow them to understand the codes of French society and give them the linguistic means to take part in daily life in France.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Les documents seront fournis par les enseignants.


    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui

    Bibiography The documents will be provided by the professors.
    MyCourse This course is on MyCourse :
    Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • MARINE ROY

  • FLE Elementaire

    FLE Elementaire

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    A l’issu de ce cours, les élèves peuvent comprendre et utiliser une série de phrases ou d'expressions simples pour se décrire ou parler d'autres personnes, de leur vie, de leurs cours, ou de leur stage en termes très simples. Ils peuvent également participer à une conversation sur des sujets très familiers qui concernent les situations quotidiennes et des étudiants.

     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    2 tests en classe ;
    Participation en classe ;
    Devoirs personnels ;
    Examen final.de 2h

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Ce cours s’adresse aux débutants en français.


    Prerequisites
    This course is for beginners in French.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Ce cours aidera les étudiants à comprendre les codes de la société française et leur donnera les outils linguistiques pour participer à la vie étudiante et quotidienne en France. Cela nécessite une participation très active de leur part.
    L'objectif est de maîtriser les structures de base du français, favoriser l'autonomie dans les situations quotidiennes, acquérir des comportements et des savoir-faire, et adopter des réflexes interculturels.
    Les étudiants travailleront sur toutes les compétences requises (travail oral et écrit, compréhension orale et écrite, interaction) à l'aide de documents authentiques de différents types (documents audio, vidéos, articles, dialogues ...).
    La classe sera basée sur des travaux de communication et des simulations pour développer l'interaction orale. Ce travail sera soutenu par des exercices de grammaire et de phonétique en contexte.

    L’alphabet, épeler son nom / Prononciation et orthographe des sons. Les syllabes / Présenter un homme, une femme, sa famille.
    Se présenter : donner et demander des informations personnelles ou professionnelles simples / Donner et demander son adresse, son courriel, son numéro de téléphone.
    Etablir les contacts sociaux, présentation et usages / Rencontrer, saluer, remercier, s’excuser, dire au revoir / Le « tu » et le « vous »
    Faire connaissance à l’université, en stage d’entreprise / Assister à un évènement et échanger avec les participants / Parler de ses goûts, de ses préférences / Faire un commentaire positif, négatif.
    Les moyens de paiement / Payer et retirer de l’argent / Faire des achats, parler des quantités exprimées et non exprimées / Demander le prix.
    Aller au restaurant : réserver une table, commander un repas, poser des questions sur la carte, demander et vérifier l’addition.
    Décrire les activités de la vie quotidienne / Se situer dans l’espace et le temps / Parler de son emploi du temps / Organiser une journée de travail, donner des instructions et organiser un programme.
    Demander et donner des indications horaires / Réserver et acheter un billet de train, d’avion, une chambre d’hôtel.
    Prendre les transports en commun. Demander des renseignements à la station de métro, à la gare / S’orienter et orienter dans l’espace. Dire où l’on est, dire où l’on va.
    Parler des lieux, localiser, choisir et expliquer un itinéraire / Demander son chemin / Décrire un lieu.
    Proposer une activité, inviter, répondre à une invitation, exprimer l’incertitude.
    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Documents fournis par le professeurs.
    Objectif exress 1, Hachette fle.
    Totem 1, Hachette
    Vocabulaire progressif du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    Communication progressive du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    DVD Totem, Alter Ego 1.
    Français des relations professionnelles.
    Grammaire progressive du français débutant. Cle.

    Bibiography

    Documents provided by the professor.
    Objectif Exress 1, Hachette FLE.
    Totem 1, Hachette.
    Vocabulaire progressif du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    Communication progressive du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    DVD Totem, Alter Ego 1.
    Français des relations professionnelles.
    Grammaire progressive du français débutant. Cle.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse: Yes
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • PASCALE RIBARDIERE

  • FLE A1: Cours Général

    FLE A1: Cours Général

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compréhension orale, production orale, compréhension écrite, production écrite :
    en interaction.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Participation en classe /20 + contrôle continu /20 + contrôle final /20 = note finale /20

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Aucun prérequis n'est nécessaire pour suivre ce cours.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Ce cours amènera l'apprenant à interagir à l'oral et à l'écrit dans des contextes de la vie quotidienne afin de se familiariser aux expressions courantes liées à son environnement concret et immédiat.

    La première partie de chaque session sera consacrée à l'étude des outils linguistiques et grammaticaux utiles pour l'objectif visé, la seconde, à leur application pratique.


    Plan du cours:

    Faire connaissance / S'exprimer en classe /Demander des informations
    Se situer dans l'espace / Donner un itinéraire
    Exprimer ses goûts /Donner une quantité / Commander au restaurant
    Parler de sa journée et ses habitudes quotidiennes
    Prendre et fixer rendez-vous/ Proposer, refuser, accepter une invitation
    Parler du temps qu'il fait / Parler de l'avenir
    S'exprimer poliment
    Comprendre et donner des conseils ou ordres / Effectuer des achats
    Raconter une situation passée
    Se situer dans le temps
    Découvrir Paris
    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    À propos A1, PUG, 2009.
    Réussir le DELF : niveau A1 du Cadre européen commun de référence, Didier Hatier, 2005.
    Vocabulaire en dialogues, niveau débutant, CLE international, 2007.
    Grammaire en dialogues, CLE International, 2005.
    Alter ego A1 et A1+, Hachette, 2006.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • VANESSA DARRIBEHAUDE

  • FLE A2: Cours Général

    FLE A2: Cours Général

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    A la fin du semestre, l’étudiant sera à l’aise pour comprendre des phrases simples de la vie de tous les jours sur des sujets familiers. Il sera aisé pour lui de se faire comprendre et de défendre son point de vue lors d’une brève intervention. Il pourra décrire sa vie à Paris, son travail, ses activités actuelles et passées. Il parlera de ses souhaits, de ses obligations, donner ses impressions. Il sera aussi capable de se débrouiller dans une banque et chez le médecin.
    Il saura présenter un exposé devant le groupe et il sera à l’aise pour animer un débat.
    L’apprenant saura utiliser des expressions toutes faites et utiliser des connecteurs simples.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Contrôle continu :

    Compréhension orale : 20%
    Compréhension écrite : 20%
    Exposé : 10%
    Participation orale : 20%
    Examen final :

    Production écrite : 30%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    L’étudiant doit déjà savoir communiquer dans des situations immédiates et urgentes. Il sait présenter ses proches, décrire des personnes ou des lieux. Il est capable de présenter ses activités de tous les jours. Il peut poser des questions et échanger des informations simples.

    L’étudiant doit avoir suivi le séminaire intensif de français, obtenu le niveau A2 au test de langue en ligne ou présenter un certificat attestant de son niveau.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Dans ce cours, les étudiants comprennent des phrases simples traitant de sujets de leur vie active et quotidienne. Il s’agit de leur apprendre à participer à une conversation facile. Ils travaillent sur des documents écrits ayant trait à la vie de tous les jours.
    L’apprenant fait un exposé, répond à des questions et réagit à des déclarations. Il anime un débat.
    A chaque cours, nous faisons des jeux de rôles, de la phonétique, des exercices pour reprendre le contenu grammatical et lexical. Nous comparons et commentons les différences culturelles, les modes de vie en France et dans les pays représentés par les étudiants.

    L’objectif communicatif de ce cours est de pouvoir se présenter, parler de son habitation et de son environnement, des traditions dans son pays, de sa personnalité, de ses goûts et de ses rêves. Evoquer aussi ses souvenirs, ses volontés.
    Donner son opinion sur un spectacle, argumenter. Savoir commander un menu dans un restaurant. Echanger à propos de son travail. Parler au téléphone pour prendre rendez-vous avec un médecin.
    Il s’agit aussi d’encourager l’étudiant à présenter un exposé sur un sujet de société ou sur une personnalité, seul ou à deux, devant le groupe. Et animer un débat en sachant donner la parole à chacun.

    A l’écrit, l’étudiant apprend à rédiger une lettre pour faire une contestation. Et envoyer un mail pour proposer une sortie avec ses amis ou sa famille.


    Plan du cours:

    L’argent, la banque
    La maison, le logement
    Le temps qui passe
    Votre personnalité
    Les souvenirs
    Ses volontés et ses souhaits
    La santé
    L’obligation
    La ville
    Les sorties
    Au restaurant
    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Grammaire progressive du français, CLE International
    A Propos A2, PUG
    Totem A2, Hachette
    Jouer, communiquer, apprendre, Hachette

    MyCourse
    Le cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FLE B1: La Mondialisation par le FLE

    FLE B1: La Mondialisation par le FLE

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    La démarche pédagogique se situera dans une logique actionnelle : l’apprenant est mis en situation. L’accent sera mis sur la prise de parole et les échanges au sein du groupe. Les activités sont adaptées aux profils des apprenants et prennent appui dans des situations de la vie quotidienne et professionnelle.
    Afin d’améliorer leurs compétences en rédaction, les étudiants recevront des devoirs et des essais divers en relation avec les sujets du cours. Ils seront également invités à préparer des présentations orales et des débats.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    L’évaluation tiendra compte de plusieurs aspects :

    Participation active en classe
    Remise des activités à faire en dehors de la classe
    Exposé oral à faire en binôme
    Examen final de 2h

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    L’étudiant doit maîtriser le niveau A2 du Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues (CECRL).
    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    En savoir plus sur la culture française et renforcer vos compétences d’écoute à travers des nouvelles, des films et des exercices :
    http://apprendre.tv5monde.com/http://apprendre.tv5monde.com/ ,
    http://savoirs.rfi.fr/fr/apprendre-enseignerhttp://savoirs.rfi.fr/fr/apprendre-enseigner et
    http://www.francaisfacile.com/http://www.francaisfacile.com
    Delatour, Y. et al, Nouvelle grammaire du français, Cours de civilisation française de la Sorbonne, Paris, Hachette, 2004.
    Préparation au DELF B1 : BRETON Gilles, LEPAGE Sylvie, ROUSSE Marie, Réussir le DELF B1, Paris, Didier, 2010 or DURAND Caroline, DELF en piste?! B1, Paris, Ellipses, 2013.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui

    Enseignant responsable :

    • JUGURTA BENTIFRAOUINE

  • FLE B1: Cinéma et société

    FLE B1: Cinéma et société

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    A la fin du cours, les étudiants peuvent s’attendre à maîtriser le vocabulaire du cinéma, des éléments essentiels du langage cinématographique et de l’histoire du cinéma, ainsi que des notions sur l’économie du cinéma aujourd’hui.
    La capacité d’analyser et interpréter un film ainsi que d’établir des comparaisons entre le cinéma en France et dans le pays des étudiants sera aussi partie prenante du cours, focaliser sur le développement des quatre compétences : compréhension orale et écrite, production orale et écrite de niveau B1.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Les deux devoirs en classe consistent en des questions sur les dates et notions importantes vues en classe, le vocabulaire, la grammaire et les conjugaisons, ainsi qu’en une production écrite sur le thème du cinéma.

    Participation, devoirs (résumé de films français) : 20%
    Contrôle en classe : 20%
    Examen final de 2h : 30%
    “Dossier film” : 30%
    Le Dossier film est un travail réalisé en groupe de 3 ou 4 étudiants autour d’un film en langue française choisi par le groupe.

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Le cours s’adresse aux étudiants de niveau intermédiaire/indépendant.
    Aucune expérience dans l’étude du cinéma n’est exigée.
    Il est nécessaire d’avoir suivi le séminaire intensif ou justifier d’un niveau A2 minimum par une attestation.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    FLE-B1 Cinéma et Société est un cours de cinéma de français intermédiaire / indépendant sur le thème du cinéma qui a permet aux étudiants de maintenir et consolider leur niveau B1 en français tout en étudiant la culture française à travers le prisme du cinéma. Des visionnages individuels, des discussions et des recherches collectives alimentent la réflexion en classe tandis que des leçons sur l’histoire du cinéma et le langage cinématographique donnent une idée de la place du “7e art” dans l’histoire moderne et la culture contemporaine, dont il est un élément incontournable.

    En fin de semestre, les étudiants devront être capable d’écrire un essai sur le film analysé en classe, et de se référer aux notions d’histoire du cinéma et de langage cinématographique étudiées.
    Le niveau B1 en grammaire et conjugaison doit être maîtrisé.
    Les étudiants doivent également se montrer capable de collaborer et s’investir dans un projet de groupe autour d’un film, sa réception, son sens et son époque.


    Plan du cours

    Présentation du cours. Vocabulaire du cinéma
    Histoire du cinéma : Le “Pré-cinéma”. Les cinémas parisiens.
    Histoire du cinéma : Les frères Lumière et la première séance de cinéma
    Histoire du cinéma : George Méliès, le magicien. Grammaire/conjugaison de niveau B1 : le présent des verbes à 2 bases / Les pronoms compléments / les expressions suivies de l’infinitif
    Le langage cinématographique : les valeurs de cadre. Grammaire/conjugaison de niveau B1 : le présent des verbes à 2 bases / Les pronoms compléments / les expressions suivies de l’infinitif
    Histoire du cinéma : Max Linder, la première vedette du cinéma
    Contrôle en classe
    « Dossier film », création des groupes et lancement du projet. Le langage cinématographique : les raccords
    Projection de « Les Yeux sans visage » George Franju, France-Italie, 1960 ou «Fanny », Marcel Pagnol, France, 1932
    Analyse du film étudié. Langage cinématographique : les mouvements de caméra
    L’économie du cinéma en France
    Grammaire : révision
    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    « Histoire du cinéma français » Jean-Pierre Jeancolas, Armand Colin, 2011.MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui

    Enseignant responsable :

    • FLORENT RICHARD

  • FLE B1: Paris Cité des arts

    FLE B1: Paris Cité des arts

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    La méthode pour analyser l’art représente la capacité d’observer, de poser des questions et de justifier une interprétation de n’importe quelle œuvre d’art. Après le semestre, les étudiants seront capables de commencer une interprétation (le message, l’idée, l’intention d’une œuvre), basée sur une observation générale et détaillée. Ils seront capables de la faire en français, en utilisant un vocabulaire spécifique et des références à l’histoire de l’art, ainsi qu’une large base de connaissances sur la ville de Paris.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Essai n°1 20%
    Essai n°2 20%
    Présentation en groupe 20%
    Examen Final 40%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Pour participer à ce cours, il faut posséder un niveau B1 à l’écrit et à l’oral et chercher à développer activement ses compétences en français, à travers la lecture régulière et l’utilisation des médias en français. Il faut aimer poser des questions, analyser, vouloir comprendre et décrypter seul et en groupe. La participation en classe et le travail collectif sont impératifs. Il n’y a pas besoin de connaître l’art ou les artistes, mais il est nécessaire de vouloir plonger dans l’histoire de l’art et des mouvements artistiques du passé pour comprendre ceux du présent.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Nous étudions dans ce cours la place de Paris dans l’histoire de l’art, et plus précisément nous enquêtons sur l’existence de trois grands musées, dans l’ordre chronologique : le musée du Louvre, le musée d’Orsay et le Centre Pompidou.
    Pour les étudiants étrangers à Dauphine, ces musées sont connus et réputés, mais ce qui les sépare n’est pas très clair : est-ce une raison historique ? Chronologique ? Des mouvements artistiques différents ? Une volonté politique ?

    Les objectifs de cette classe sont de développer les capacités à interpréter l’art aujourd’hui, en comprenant les changements majeurs qui ont eu lieu au XIXème siècle, particulièrement lorsque Paris était la ville des profondes et radicales évolutions artistiques.
    Les activités dans la classe permettront aux étudiants de construire une méthode et de l’utiliser, pour observer, analyser et interpréter des œuvres comme des peintures, sculptures et bâtiments.
    La différence entre les 3 musées d’art principaux à Paris est une référence constante pour devenir capable de comprendre les connexions d’une œuvre d’art avec la société, les mouvements passés ou futurs, and la situation de l’art aujourd’hui.
    Les étudiants seront amenés à maîtriser le français oral de niveau B1 pour progresser au long du semestre au niveau B2 (comprendre et utiliser les registres de langues, les expressions, les phrases complexes). Ils utiliseront chaque semaine le français pour converser avec le professeur et débattre entre étudiants, par groupe ou en classe complète. Le français écrit sera utilisé à chaque séance pour des prises de notes, questionnaires, et lors de la rédaction des 2 essais et de l’examen final. A la fin du semestre, les compétences écrites sont celles de la description, de l’argumentation, de l’analyse et de l’élaboration d’idées personnelles.


    Plan du cours:

    Introduction – méthode d’analyse d’une œuvre d’art – le regard. Les Coquelicots de Monet, Le Bal du moulin de la Galette de Renoir, Composition de Mondrian, les Nymphéas de Monet.
    Introduction 2 - Utilisation de la méthode – justifier une interprétation. Autoportrait de Van Gogh, La Joconde de Léonard de Vinci, le Penseur de Rodin, Equilibrium de Jeff Koons, la Fondation Louis Vuitton de Frank Gehry.
    L’architecture et l’Histoire . Les arènes de Lutèce, le musée Cluny, Notre-Dame de Paris, le Louvre, l’Arc de Triomphe, la Commune
    Hausmann et Napoléon III. La Révolution Industrielle, la bourgeoisie, la transformation de Paris, les collections d’art – essai n°1 200 mots sur la Révolution Industrielle dans l’art
    La sculpture. Les sculptures antiques, la Vénus de Milo, les Esclaves de Michel-Ange, les canons de l’art
    La sculpture. La sculpture après la photographie : Rodin, Claudel, Brancusi
    Visite. Essai n°2 – musée Rodin à Paris
    La peinture classique, David, Ingres, les Impressionnistes, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Caillebotte, Degas
    La peinture moderne et l’art moderne. Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gauguin, Picasso, Dali, Braque, Matisse, Duchamp, Delaunay, Kandinsky, Malévitch, Magritte, Mondrian, + Exposés
    l’art moderne dans la ville. Arman, Tinguely, de St Phalle, Oldenburg, Buren + Exposés
    L’art contemporain. L’art après la Seconde guerre mondiale, Pollock, Warhol, Basquiat, le Nouveau Réalisme, Klein, Raysse, de St Phalle + Exposés
    Examen final : 4 œuvres à analyser en 2 heures

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    GOMBRICH, E.H., Histoire de l’Art, Phaidon, 2001.
    ARASSE, D., On n’y voit rien : Descriptions, Gallimard, 2006.
    ARASSE, D. Histoires de Peintures, Gallimard, 2006.
    ANTOINE-ANDERSEN, Véronique, L’Art pour comprendre le Monde, Actes Sud, 2011.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui

    Enseignant responsable :

    • SEBASTIEN PRUVOST
    • BAPTISTE LEBRETON

  • FLE B2: Les Enjeux de l'actualité

    FLE B2: Les Enjeux de l'actualité

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    A l’issue de ce cours, l’étudiant aura acquis tant sur le plan argumentatif que culturel les outils lui permettant de participer pleinement à des conversations sur des thèmes de société avec des locuteurs natifs. Il sera capable d’exprimer et de défendre des points de vue.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    L’étudiant sera évalué par des tests de connaissance de l’actualité (en classe), des commentaires ou dossiers (en classe et à la maison) et sa participation à chaque séance. Une participation active de chaque étudiant est absolument nécessaire au bon déroulement de ce cours.

    Tests en classe 20%
    Travaux à la maison 25%
    Participation 25%
    Examen final 30%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Pour pouvoir assister à ce cours de niveau B2, les étudiants doivent être capables de comprendre des articles relativement complexes de la presse française et de débattre à propos de thèmes d’actualité. Ils doivent avoir une certaine maîtrise des outils de l’argumentation.
    Les étudiants devront attester de leur niveau soit par une attestation de niveau B1 minimum ou avoir suivi le séminaire intensif en début de semestre.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Dans ce cours intitulé « Les enjeux de l’actualité française », les étudiants liront très régulièrement la presse et analyseront d’un point de vue interculturel les thèmes qui font l’actualité en France. L’enseignant leur fournira les outils linguistiques et culturels qui leur permettront de commenter l’actualité française. Le cours abordera à travers l’actualité, les grands thèmes de civilisation française. L’actualité française comprend non seulement ce qui se passe en France mais aussi ce que les médias français choisissent de mettre dans l’actualité.

    L’objectif de ce cours est de donner aux étudiants, à travers l’analyse et le commentaire de l’actualité française, les outils linguistiques et culturels leur permettant de développer leur expression orale (lors des débats en classe) et écrite (dans des commentaires d’article).


    Plan du cours
    Ce cours étant basé sur l’actualité, il est impossible de fournir un programme par semaine. Le cours hebdomadaire est divisé en deux parties. Dans la première partie, à partir des lectures de la presse, les étudiants sous la direction de l’enseignant, établissent une revue de presse générale de la semaine qui s’est écoulée depuis le cours précédent. Dans la deuxième partie, un thème de l’actualité est approfondi par la lecture d’articles. Le professeur sélectionne ce thème en fonction de sa pertinence culturelle.
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Lecture régulière de la presse française.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui

    Enseignant responsable :

    • VERONIQUE TEYSSANDIER

  • FLE B2: Sémiotique du marketing

    FLE B2: Sémiotique du marketing

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Comme décrit dans l’aperçu, les étudiants seront capables d’utiliser les outils sémiotiques pour aiguiser leurs compétences de réception comme de production à propos de documents marketing, devenant ainsi de plus en plus conscients de ce qui est sous-jacent dans les signes marketing tels que publicités TV ou affiches, mais également emails promotionnels ou tout type de documents qu’ils seront eux-mêmes susceptibles de produire.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Test de mi- semestre 20%
    Exposés en groupe 20%
    Participation 20%
    Test final 40%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Pour participer à ce cours, il faut posséder un niveau B2 à l’écrit et à l’oral et chercher à développer activement ses compétences en français, à travers la lecture régulière et l’utilisation des médias en français. Il faut aimer poser des questions, analyser, vouloir comprendre et décrypter seul et en groupe. La participation en classe et le travail collectif sont impératifs.
    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    BARTHES, Roland. Mythologies. Paris : Éditions du Seuil, 1957. Collection Points. ISBN 2-02-000585-9
    ECO, Umberto, Le Signe. (Segno : Milan : Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, 1980) Bruxelles : Editions Labor, 1988, Livre de Poche, Collection « Biblio Essais ». ISBN 978-2-253-06094-9
    FLOCH, Jean-Marie, Sémiotique, Marketing et Communication », Paris, PUF, 1990. Collection « Formes sémiotiques ». ISBN 22407230-12-01
    FRAENKEL, Béatrice, LEGRIS-DESPORTES, Christiane, Entreprise et sémiologie- analyser le sens pour maïtriser l’action. Paris, Dunod, 1999, Collection Marketing-Communication, ISBN 9782100037247
    KLINKENBERG, Jean-Marie, Précis de sémiotique générale, De Boeck S.A. Larcier, 1996. Point Seuil-Collection Essais. ISBN 2-02036703-3.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Non

    Enseignant responsable :

    • SEBASTIEN PRUVOST

  • FLE B2: Sociologie de la France et des français

    FLE B2: Sociologie de la France et des français

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Ce cours permet aux étudiants d’utiliser des concepts sociologiques pertinents pour analyser leur propre situation. Le semestre à Dauphine est une expérience sociologique en soi, et les outils d’observation et la méthodologie sont particulièrement utiles pour décrire et décoder l’environnement social. Les étudiants ont besoin d’une utilisation intense de la langue française, à l’écrit comme à l’oral, pour l’expression et la compréhension. Ils seront donc capables d’exprimer en français précis les résultats de leurs recherches, basés sur leurs expériences.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Essai n°1 20%
    Essai n°2 20%
    Présentation en groupe 20%
    Examen Final 40%
    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.


    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Pour participer à ce cours, il faut posséder un niveau B2 à l’écrit et à l’oral et chercher à développer activement ses compétences en français, à travers la lecture régulière et l’utilisation des médias en français. Il faut aimer poser des questions, analyser, vouloir comprendre et décrypter seul et en groupe. La participation en classe et le travail collectif sont impératifs.
    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MOLENAT, Xavier, La Sociologie : Histoire, Idées, Courants, Éditions Sciences Humaines, 2009.
    DURKHEIM, Émile, Les règles de la méthode sociologique, 1895, Flammarion (2010).
    WEBER Max, Économie et société, tome 1 : Les Catégories de la sociologie, 1921, Pocket (2003).
    BOURDIEU, Pierre, La Distinction, Éditions de Minuit, 1979.
    AUGÉ, Marc, Un Ethnologue dans le métro, Pluriel, 2013.
    LE BRETON, David, Sociologie du corps, « Que Sais-Je ? » PUF, 2016.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • BAPTISTE LEBRETON

Business

  • Management Information System

    Management Information System

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students will be able to

    Identify, model and improve business processes
    Analyze the informational dimensions of an organizations (information flux, information quality, information processing)
    Analyze the technological dimensions of an organization (technological constraints related to software, hardware, network and database issues)
    Analyze the organizational dimensions of the IT project (identify key stakeholders, describe organizational culture, find key leverages for change management)
    Formulate a plan of action for the project scope (features, business process changes, use cases)
    Formulate a plan of action for project management (communication plan, implementation plan)
    The course will also provide students with elements of IT culture relevant for future managers involved in IT Projects.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Weekly activities are required from each student, conducted in group. These assignments are graded by peers. Consequently, one of the weekly assignments is the grading of another groups’ assignment.
    At Week 6, students deliver a first version of the need’s analysis. This first deliverable is defended in front of a teacher, acting as senior consultant (20 %)
    At week 12, students deliver the final version of the functional specifications (40 %). This deliverable is defended in front of a panel of teachers, acting as the client company. The defense is attributed a grade (40 %).

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    There are no formal prerequisites. General culture on how organizations operate is welcome.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course will provide a general and practical overview of the issue of managing information systems in contemporary organizations. The course helps students analyze information systems problematics by using a multi-focal perspective on IS issues, focusing on information, technological and organizational dimensions of all IT projects. In order to do so, students will have to deal with a detailed case study, which they will have to solve in group and in 12 weeks, thanks to a sequence of activities. These activities are mostly carried out on line, the in-class hours being dedicated to answering students’ questions and framing their work.


    Course structure

    Introduction to Management of Information Systems
    Business Process Modeling
    Business Process Reengineering
    Informational analysis
    Technological Analysis
    Organizational Analysis
    Needs Analysis
    Change Management in IT Projects
    Risk Management in IT Projects
    Privacy related issues in IT Projects
    Drafting functional specifications
    Defense.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • PIERRE LANIRAY
    • ANOUCK ADROT

  • Corporate Social Responsibility

    Corporate Social Responsibility

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the Corporate Social Responsibility class offered by Paris Dauphine University students will be able to understand and critically discuss the concepts and topics of corporate social responsibility as well as business’ responsibility. They will have a comprehensive understanding of sustainability challenges (social, environmental and economic development) that companies face and how transform these challenges into business opportunities.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Examination modalities:

    Oral participation / Attendance 20%
    Group Presentation 40%
    (from course 3 to course 11)

    Final Exam 40% (course 13)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    ?Prerequisites
    A great motivation to know more about CSR and how it works in today’s business is sufficient to participate to this class.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    For the past 25 years, notably since the 1992 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio, companies have increasingly invested resources to appear committed to Sustainable Development.
    But where are we now? Is it more than mere window-dressing? What kind of value do sustainable practices create? This course combines a descriptive and a practical approach to the implementation of sustainable practices into an international and multi-dimensional/sectorial business environment, including description of multiple cases and concrete example from professional speakers. The first half of each class will take the form of a lecture, while the second half will consist of practical cases, group works, role playing games etc.

    Objectives:
    Provide students with a comprehensive understanding of Sustainable Development and sustainability challenges (social, economic and regulatory) companies now face (from SMEs to large international corporates). Demonstrate students that Sustainable Development, from a business perspective, is viable when integrated into a business strategy.


    Course structure

    Introduction – A History of Sustainable Development, from environmental awareness to corporate social responsibility
    The Challenges of Sustainable Development
    The Principles of Sustainable Development
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Integrating Sustainable Development in companies
    CSR and Financial Markets
    CSR and Customers
    CSR and the Supply Chain
    Enhancing its CSR approach
    Measuring CSR performance
    Creating value with Partnerships
    Creating a CSR Strategy
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    The United Nations. Millennium Development Goals Report 2015
    UNEP-FI. The Positive Impact Manifesto. 2017
    EU High-Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance – Financing a sustainable European economy – 2018
    Handbook of Research on Marketing and Corporate Social Responsibility - Edited by Ronald Paul Hill, Villanova University, US and Ryan Langan, Assistant Professor of Marketing, University of San Francisco, US
    CSR AS A Management Idea, Ethics in Action. Edited by Mats Jutterström and Peter Norberg, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden
    IFC Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability – IFC, January 2012.
    The A to Z of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Complete Reference Guide to Concepts, Codes and Organizations. Wayne Visser, Dirk Matten, Manfred Pohl, Nick Tolhurst, Katja Böhmer, Aron Ghebremariam, Judith Hennigfeld, Sandra S. Huble, 2007.
    The Oxford Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility. Crane, 2008.
    https://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/csr_guide.pdfhttps://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/csr_guide.pdf

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
  • International Marketing

    International Marketing

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

    Learning outcomes
    Based on this course, participants will:

    Get an overview of extent of and implications from globalized markets
    Appreciate opportunities and understanding pitfalls of international marketing.
    Be able to frame and structure the challenges of and approaches to international marketing.
    Be able to define marketing strategies for a global arena
    Know how to use tools to prepare and implement marketing action across country markets
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Grading Criteria

    Case studies and participation 30%
    Final Exam 70%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021
    Course description and objectives
    Globalization has developed from a trend into a fact. SMEs, which traditionally have been the backbone of the German economy, need to actively address the issue of business that crosses borders. To perform in an increasingly competitive international environment, companies need to understand the challenges and opportunities of globalization and act appropriately. Consequently, this module provides to managers a profound skill- and knowledge base needed for international marketing success.

    The key topics to be covered are as follows:

    Facts and figures on globalized markets.
    Cultural diversity and its impact on buying and marketing
    Coordination of marketing activities across country markets
    Product standardization vs. price discrimination
    Best practice insights from a global marketing champion

    Course structure

    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 1/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 2/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 3/4
    The framework for international marketing decisions Culture and consumer behavior 4/4
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (1/3)
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (2/3)
    International market segmentation and selection International marketing mix decisions (3/3)
    Case study 1
    Understanding competitive intelligence under the framework of international marketing
    Impact of digital revolution in international marketing (1/2)
    Impact of digital revolution in international marketing (2/2)
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    International Marketing de Pervez Ghauri (Auteur),? Philip R. Cateora (Auteur)

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • Marketing of the Luxury Sector

    Marketing of the Luxury Sector

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    After completion of the course the student should be able to:


    Understand the main challenges of luxury retail: boutiques, travel retail and e-commerce
    Describe luxury clients and identify their needs
    Be aware of the main evolutions in luxury
    Identify main luxury players, strategies and issues: towards a “retailization” of luxury
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Grading Criteria

    Case studies 30%
    Participation 20%
    Final Exam 50%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Interest for luxury goods and services

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The goal of this class is to familiarize the students with luxury codes (specificities) and communication, and to emphasize that luxury marketing is different from the “classic” marketing used for the mass market. After a brief review of fundamental marketing concepts, such as brand, identity and image, we will study the specificities of luxury (the do's and don'ts, the different perceptions, the influence of cultures, the different types of clients) and we will analyze how brands should communicate using various tools (celebrities, products placement, events, digital) in order to share their values and educate their clients on their brands codes.
    Course Objectives
    To learn, understand and be able to apply the necessary theory and tools to support strategic decision-making and the strategic management process within organizations.
    This course gives you a perspective on the financial and organizational techniques required for the effective execution of strategic decisions, and the critical role that managerial leadership plays in the viability and growth of a business.
    The course covers management control and systems used in management control. The starting point for the use of management control systems are that organizations need to plan, implement, monitor, evaluate and adapt organizations with the aim to achieve specified goals. Within the context of the course there will be insights into control methods and control philosophies, responsibilities, production financial and logistical concepts, production processes, forecasts, and the elaboration of balanced scorecards.


    Course structure

    SessionTopic

    Introduction and icebreaker
    Presentation of assessments
    Some definitions: brand, identity, image
    Group workshop on identity and image
    Characteristics of luxury
    Differences between luxury and fashion, luxury and prestige
    The anti-laws of marketing: specifics marketing and sales rules to be applied to luxury brands and services
    Group workshop: from shoes to beauty (brand extension in luxury)
    Influence of culture on luxury (based on Morand and Dubois)
    Some theories applied to luxury: Veblen (price, status), Bourdieu (distinction), Karpik (desingularization)
    The clients of luxury: who, where and why. Focus on HNWI and UHNWI
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    The Luxury Strategy: Breaking The Rules of Marketing to Build Luxury Brands (dissecting the luxury concept and defining the counter-intuitive rules for luxury marketing), Jean-Noel Kapferer and Vincent Bastien, Sept. 2012 (second edition), ISBN-13: 978-0749454777
    Managing fashion and luxury companies, Erica Corbellini & Stefania Saviolo, Feb. 2009 (second edition), ISBN-13: 978-0470830260

    Eckhardt, G. M., Belk, R. W., et Wilson, J. A. J., The rise of inconspicuous consumption. Journal of Marketing Management, 31(7–8), 807–826, 2014
    Kapferer, J.-N, The artification of luxury: From artisans to artists. Business Horizons, Vol. 57(3), 371–380, 2014

    Luxury Brand Management (A world of Privilege), Michel Chevalier & Ge´rald Mazzalovo, May 2012 (second edition), ISBN-13: 978-1118171769
    The Theory of the Leisure Class, Thorstein Veblen, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2017), ISBN-13: 978-1979980623
    Berger, J., et Ward, M., Subtle Signals of Inconspicuous Consumption. Journal of Consumer Research, 37(4), 555–569, 2010
    Holt D., Does Cultural Capital Structure American Consumption, Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 25, June 1998
    Kastanakis, M. N., et Balabanis, G., Explaining variation in conspicuous luxury consumption: An individual differences’ perspective. Journal of Business Research, 67(10), 2147–2154, 2014
  • Management Control

    Management Control

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Build ethical MCS
    Build helpful MCS for managers
    Understand how managers can use those systems
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Exam: 2 hours Exam will be a mix between questions on concepts learnt (6 points) and a case study applying these concepts (14 points)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Some notions on management accounting (cost calculations, budget, KPI and scorecards)

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course provides materials for a comprehensive course on management control systems (MCSs). MCSs are defined broadly to include everything managers do to help ensure that their organization’s strategies and plans are carried out or, if conditions warrant, that they are modified. Thus, the course focuses on topics related to “strategy implementation” or “execution.” While the treatment of the MCS subject is broad, the primary focus of the course is on what we call results controls, which involve motivating employees to produce the outcomes the organization wants. This type of management control, which requires performance measures and evaluations and the provision of incentives, dominates in importance in the vast majority of organizations.

    Because management control is a core function of management, all students interested in business or management can benefit from this course. However, this course should be particularly useful for those who are, or aspire to be, managers, management consultants, financial specialists (for example, controller, financial analyst, auditor), or human resource specialists (for example, personnel director, compensation consultant).

    Objectives:
    Each student should be able to design a management control system, to understand how management control systems can help to implement strategies and how it is integrated to the management process.


    Course structure

    Purposes of management control
    Actions, result, cultural and personal control Patagonia, cf les autres Sears
    Control System Tightness and costs
    Financial Responsibility Centers
    Planning & budgeting
    STET case study
    Financial Performance Measures and their Effects
    The Effects of Environmental Uncertainty, Organizational Strategy, and Multinationality on Management Control Systems
    Combinations of Measures and Other Remedies to the Myopia Problem
    Using Financial Results Controls in the Presence of Uncontrollable Factors
    Management Control-Related Ethical Issues and Analyses
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Kennet Merchant et Wim Ven der Stede, Management Control Systems 4th Edition, 2017

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
  • Principle of Marketing

    Principle of Marketing

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    The specific objectives of this course are the following:
    - Discover and understand the key notions and tools of marketing
    - Understand the importance of consumer insights
    - Discover the components of a marketing strategy as well as those of the marketing mix
    - Evaluate and critically analyse a marketing strategy
    - Develop a consistent marketing strategy
    - Understand current developments in the marketing discipline
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    The course evaluation will be based on:
     

    An individual exam (50%)
    A Marketing Team Project (35%): a presentation of a company’s marketing strategy + the critical analysis of the marketing mix elements + valuable recommendations for improvement + marketing metrics/indicators allowing to evaluate the performance
    A marketing simulation game (15%)
    Class preparation and active participation (bonus points: 5%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course aims at giving a general overview of Marketing, developing its main concepts, methodologies and practices. This introductory course will provide a good basis for students who wish to pursue with a master’s in marketing, as well as those who are curious to know more about the fundamentals of this subject.
    The course will consist of theoretical lectures (class topics detailed below), enriched with in-class discussions based on exercises and analysis of appropriate case studies / examples. These concepts will be applied to an end-of-term group project as well as through a virtual simulation game.


    Course structure

    Introduction to marketing and to the module
    Understanding consumers
    Understanding the market environment + Market research
    Marketing strategy + branding
    Marketing mix - Product and services
    Marketing mix - Communication
    Marketing mix - Distribution
    Marketing mix - Price
    Contemporary issues in marketing
    Simbrand Business Game
    Simbrand Business Game
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Kotler P. & Armstrong G.,
    Principles of Marketing. Pearson Education.

    Available in 658.8 PRI


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • Strategic Customer Management

    Strategic Customer Management

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

    Learning outcomes
    Students will be able to develop a consistent and relevant customer strategy, to elaborate value propositions, to understand the principles of customer lifetime value maximization, to identify the main challenges companies face to integrate channels / touchpoints and deliver great customer experiences, to apprehend how companies choose an information system and the right technologies for managing customers, to assess the performance of customer-centric initiatives (both CRM and CEM), and to assist companies in implementing a customer strategy.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Class participation: 50% (case studies)
    Final exam: 50%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic notions of marketing (segmentation and targeting, positioning…).

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

    Course description and objectives
    According to Payne and Frow (2013), “relationship marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) can be jointly utilized to provide a clear roadmap to excellence in customer management”. Based on this conviction, the Strategic Customer Management course shows how a holistic approach to managing relationships with customers and other key stakeholders leads to increased shareholder value. Taking a practical, step-by-step approach, the students will learn the principles of relationship marketing, apply them to the development of a CRM strategy and discuss key implementation issues.

    Courses Objectives:
    The objective of this course is to equip the students with a sound foundation of strategic customer management concepts and best practices to implement SCM successfully for long-term profitability.


    Course structure

    23/01 Market-driven organizations and customer-centricity
    Strategic customer management (SCM)
    30/01 Relationship marketing principles
    Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
    06/02 Customer strategy development
    Value co-creation from the company side (Maximizing lifetime value)
    13/02 Value co-creation from the customer side
    Multi-channel integration
    27/02 Customer Experience Management (CEM)
    19/03 Information systems and technologies for customer management
    26/03 Performance assessment of CRM / CEM initiatives
    Organizing for CRM / CEM implementation
    02/04Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Payne A. and Frow P. (2013), Strategic Customer Management: Integrating Relationship Marketing and CRM, Cambridge University Press, 547 pages.
    Publications, white papers and case studies from Destination CRM, Salesforce, IBM, SAS, Cap Gemini Consulting, Accenture, Deloitte, BCG and McKinsey.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • Strategic Management

    Strategic Management

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

  • Operations Management

    Operations Management

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:


    Be familiar with core operations management concepts and processes, and their relationships with other business functions.
    Understand how Operations Management is fundamental to the value-creation processes of an organization and how it can be a source of competitive advantage.
    Understand the importance of operations to all organizations that produce goods and/or provide services.
    Understand various systems for managing operations such as Material Requirements Planning (MRP), Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Just-in-Time Production (JIT).
    Analyze situations and identify appropriate techniques for planning and scheduling.
    Understand quality theories such as TQM, Six Sigma, Lean and TOC.
    Define, analyze and solve operations problems from a strategic perspective.
    Analyze situations and offer solutions to business problems in the operations area.
    Understand the place of human factors that may influence job design and work measurement.
    Demonstrate critical thinking and the application of core competencies in business decision making.
    Understand the global environment.
    Communicate well and work collaboratively.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Class Attendance and Participation 10%
    2 Presentations (each worth 15%) 30%
    2 exams each worth 20% 40%
    Final Project 20%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Introduction to Management
    Economics 101

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    One of the key challenges in business (manufacturing and/or service) is how to manage operations effectively and efficiently. Thus, this course examines theories, concepts and strategies used in Operations Management. It is designed to introduce students to the strategic importance of various operations decisions (process and plant layout, quality, inventory and supply chain management…). We take both a theoretical and practical approach, beginning with a brief review of the fundamental purpose of management.
    We’ll explore the strategic role of operations, study some of the problems and challenges that managers face and examine the theories and strategic tools available to tackle these issues. We take this a little further by analyzing how managerial philosophy, attitudes toward work, technology and culture can affect successful implementation of an operations strategy.

    I believe business is best understood by doing, thus this course is highly participative (interactive). Roughly half of class time focuses on traditional lectures with the balance of class time devoted to discussions and group presentations. You will learn from your fellow students as much as from lectures and outside readings.

    Assigned readings and materials are vital. Preparing the assigned material before class, allows the student to gain a better understanding of the issue to be discussed in class. Students are also able to actively participate and provide valuable insights on the issues at hand.

    The objective of the assigned articles is to help students think critically about the points of view of thought leaders in operations management. This will enhance our examination of how operations management models and principles can be applied to real world organizational challenges, and assist the student in developing leadership and managerial capabilities.

    The course material is thus intended to help develop awareness and knowledge of multiple issues associated with operating a business. The cases and class activities are designed to help students in applying theory to practical situations.

    The course objective is to develop an appreciation of how the study of Operations Management can help an organization to successfully compete in the marketplace.


     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Goldratt and Cox, The Goal
    Heizer and Render, Operations Management – Sustainability and Supply Chain Management , 12th ed., 2016.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • International Consumer Behaviour

    International Consumer Behaviour

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this course, students should:
    Be familiar with key theories, concepts and issues in consumer behavior
    Understand the important role of psychology, sociology and anthropology in the study of marketing.
    Understand the influence of culture on perception and the consequences on consumer behavior.
    Understand why and how marketing should adapt to its environment.
    Acquire effective critical thinking skills and be able to apply them to complex international issues.
    Be able to dissect, analyze and apply theories and concepts to various issues in Consumer Behavior.
    Develop culturally sensitive awareness of marketing issues.
    Be able to facilitate meaningful group discussions on marketing and other related topics.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Participation: 10%
    Homework &/ Class work: 20%
    Final Project 30%
    Final exam 40%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Principles of Marketing. The student needs to be familiar with marketing concepts, cross-cultural interaction and be interested in social psychology.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Consumer behavior is a discipline that looks at why people buy the things they do. This marketing discipline applies knowledge from areas such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics to describe and understand how consumers are likely to behave. Consumer behavior attempts to understand the consumption activities of individuals as opposed to markets.

    Knowledge of consumer behavior principles allows marketers and other managers to become more effective at making good decisions. They can better predict consumer actions, determine the needs of target markets, and understand how consumers perceive and understand marketing information. An understanding of consumer behavior may also assist individuals in understanding their own buying decisions.

    Courses Objectives:
    We attempt to understand:

    The impact of purchase involvement on consumer decision making.
    The various of kinds of decision models used by consumers
    How research and consumer behavior is used in market analysis.
    The influence of culture on consumer behavior.
    The assumptions about the nature of society that play a role in marketing decisions.
    The role of demographics in influencing consumer behavior.
    How consumption decisions are made with the household unit.
    The importance of perception in the development of retail strategy, brand names, logos, media strategy, advertising and package design.
    How to use learning and memory theories to develop product positioning strategies.
    Understand the nature of personality, motivation and emotion and the role they play in the consumption process.
    How attitudes are used to segment markets.

    Course structure

    Introduction
    Consumers as Decision Makers
    Perception
    Learning and Memory
    Motivation
    The Self
    Research Project: Achieving Slimness
    Personality and Lifestyle
    Research Project: Softening & Polishing the Male Market.
    Attitude Change and Interactive Communication
    Consumers and Subcultures
    Cultural Influence on Consumer Behavior
    Introduction
    Final Project Presentation
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Michael R. Solomon,
    Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having & Being (Global Edition), - 12th edition.

    Hoyer and McInnis,
    Consumer Behavior, Harvard Business Publishing Articles and Case Studies (HBP).

    They are available for direct purchase online at Harvard Business Publishing.
    http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cbmp/access/74046517

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • Financial Marketing

    Financial Marketing

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    By the end of this unit, students will be able to describe the characteristics of the different financial markets and to know to manipulate the main tools and notions of these capital markets.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Class works (continuous assessment): 50% of the final score

    The mid-term exam counts for 25% of the final grade.
    Individual Assignment count for 15% of the final grade. Individual work consists in a group work presentation about an economic of financial question that students work out and hand to the others students. Press reviews also will be asked.
    Class participation: 10% of the final grade.

    Final exam: 50% of the final score.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    N/A

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This class focuses on the structural aspects (financial products, actors...) of the financial markets (bonds market, monetary market, stocks market...). This course is designed for students who wish to extend further their economic and financial knowledge.
    The form adopted for this teaching is “course – seminar” featuring one part with course on the basic principles and theories and some practical exercises (Most topics are introduced via the lecture method that will then covered in more detail through exercises done in class)

    Objectives: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to financial markets in its main domains as strategy, the impact of the economic environment… but also well understand the basic principles such as interest rate, loans and their amortization, investment choice, the decision to invest…
    The use of a computer and an Excel spreadsheet will be developed in the tutorials


    Course structure

    Mutual acquaintance. Constitution of the different groups of students and distribution of the various presentations and press reviews
    Presentation of the financial markets
    The interest rates and their different methods of calculation
    The bonds markets (risks, yield rate curve…)
    The different types of bonds and their amortization
    The invest choice and the decision of invest
    MID TERM EXAM
    The stocks market
    The monetary market and monetary policy
    The FOREX
    The derivative products markets (I)
    The derivative products markets (II)
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

Economics

  • The Globalization of Firms

    The Globalization of Firms

    Ects : 3
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    The students will have a deep knowledge of the main drivers of the globalization process of firms and its consequences for the welfare of countries.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    The final evaluation is based on a participation (25%) and a final exam (75%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.

     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course will provide students with the analytical tools that are essential to understand the process of globalization through the lens of firms. Lectures will focus on the key topics that are at the core of the optimal firm’s international strategy: when is it optimal to offshore production abroad? In which countries and how? When exporting is more efficient than offshoring? Which are the main trade obstacles for firm? At the end of the course, students are expected to have a good knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the determinants and the consequences of the optimal international strategy of firms. Students will also be able to read simple research articles that can be used for the writing of research or policy notes.

    Course Structure:

    A historical perspective of globalization and the role of firms
    Micro-foundation of Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) and the optimal entry mode
    The proximity-concentration trade-off
    Export, FDI and Immigrants: the optimal strategy of heterogeneous firms
    Gravity model for trade: from macro to firm perspective
    Obstacles to trade: tariff and non-tariff barriers to firm’s exports
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Krugman P., Obstfeld M., and Melitz M., (2008). International Economics: Theory and Policy. Pearson, 9th Ed.
    Chapter 2 “World trade, an overview”Chapter 6: "External Economies of Scale and the International Location of Production"Chapter 9: “The Instruments of Trade Policy”

    Baldwin, R. and Martin, P. (1999): “Two waves of globalization: superficial similarities, fundamental differences”, NBER Working Paper 6904.

    Beugelsdijk S., Brakman S., Garretsen H. and C. Van Marrewijk (2013) “International Economics and Business. Nations and Firms in the Global Economy”, ed. Cambridge University Press (second edition). Chapter 6.

    Brainard, S.L. (1993) “A Simple Theory of Multinational Corporations with a Tradeoff between Proximity and Concentration”, NBER Working Paper 4269.

    Brainard, S.L. (1997) “An Empirical Assessment of the Proximity- Concentration Trade-off Between Multinational Sales and Trade,” American Economic Review, 87(4), pages 520-544.

    Helpman, E., Melitz M. and S. Yeaple (2004) "
    https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v94y2004i1p300-316.htmlExport Versus FDI with Heterogeneous Firms,"
    https://ideas.repec.org/s/aea/aecrev.htmlAmerican Economic Review, vol. 94(1), pages 300-316.


    Ottaviano, G.I.P, Peri G. and G.C. Wright (2013) "
    https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v103y2013i5p1925-59.htmlImmigration, Offshoring, and American Jobs,"
    https://ideas.repec.org/s/aea/aecrev.htmlAmerican Economic Review, vol. 103(5), pages 1925-1959.


    Mitaritonna, C., Orefice G. and G. Peri (2017) "
    https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eecrev/v96y2017icp62-82.htmlImmigrants and firms’ outcomes: Evidence from France,"
    https://ideas.repec.org/s/eee/eecrev.htmlEuropean Economic Review, vol. 96(C), pages 62-82.


    Anderson J. and E. van Wincoop (2003) “Gravity with gravitas : A solution to the border puzzle”, The American Economic Review 93(1), pages170-192

    Chaney T. (2008) “Distorted Gravity : the intensive and extensive margins of international trade,” American Economic Review, 98(4), pages 1707-21

    Head, K. and T. Mayer (2014) “Gravity Equations : Workhouse, Toolkit, and Cookbook”, in Handbook of International Economics, Chapter 3.

    Baldwin, Richard (2013), “Multilateralising 21st century regionalism”, Paper written for OECD, available here:
    https://repository.graduateinstitute.ch/record/286980https://repository.graduateinstitute.ch/record/286980

    Fontagné, L. and G. Orefice (2017) "Let's Try Next Door: Technical Barriers to Trade and Multi-destination Firms", European Economic Review, 2018, vol. 101, pages 643-663

    Fontagné, L., Orefice G., Rocha N. and R. Piermartini (2015) "Product Standards and Margins of Trade: firm level evidence", Journal of International Economics, 2015, vol. 97(1), pages 29-44.

    Enseignant responsable :

    • GIANLUCA OREFICE

  • Energy and climate change economics

    Energy and climate change economics

  • Industrial Organisation

    Industrial Organisation

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Basic methods of quantitative Industrial organization and game theory
    Description of a market
    Strategic interaction of market players
    Basic notions of dynamic competition
    Discussion of case studies
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Oral presentation (50%)
    written exam (50%)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Microeconomics

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Industrial organization is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using the basic tools of microeconomic theory and game theory, this course will focus on the analysis of imperfectly competitive markets (monopoly and oligopoly). We shall first explore the relationships among firms in an industry by examining the nature of strategic interaction among them. We shall then analyze the strategies and methods that the firms use to preserve their monopolistic positions (deterring entry into an industry or driving rivals out of an industry), and examine the outcomes they produce. The last part of the course will deal with dynamic aspects of competition that represent critical issues in high technology and information technology industries: innovation and persistence of market dominance, network externalities and strategies in standardization.
    During the lectures the students will discuss some examples/mini case studies, to learn how economic concepts have been used in real world business and legal settings.

    Objectives: Students will be guided to understand both the theoretical and the empirical aspects of modern Industrial Organization. Their active participation through the mini-case studies discussion will help achieving these objectives.


    Course structure

    Perfect Competition, Welfare
    Technologies and Costs
    Monopoly
    Regulated Monopolies
    Oligopoly: Cournot Competition
    Oligopoly: Bertrand Competition
    Practice Session: Case Studies
    Collusion
    Research and Development
    Advertising
    Practice Session: Case Studies
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    L. Cabral (2017),
    Introduction to Industrial Organization, MIT Press.

    Pepall L., D. Richards and G. Norman (2008),
    Industrial Organization, Contemporary Theory and Empirical Applications, Fourth Edition, Blackwell Publishing

    Selected readings from Tirole J.,
    The theory of industrial organization (1988), MIT Press


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • The Transition Towards a Zero-Carbon World

    The Transition Towards a Zero-Carbon World

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Understand the challenges and the opportunities of the transition towards a zero-carbon world Assess the stakeholders (national states versus non-state stakeholders - international, supranational, local, companies, civil society etc.) impact on the path to a zero-carbon world Be able to apply the course knowledge in other courses and in the future professional career Be able to work with international data, read them, analyze them and write down reports based on them 2 Be able to do fast and in-depth researches on unknown topics and write down briefing notes
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Briefing notes: work in groups on the stakeholders (Maria GAINAR)
    Briefing notes in groups: assessing the impacts of a local zero-carbon scenario from an economic, social and environmental perspective (Camille CHARDONNET)

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis recommandés :
    Prerequisites
    Association Négawatt, Manifeste Négawatt.
    En route pour la transition énergétique !, Actes Sud, 2015, pp. 31-58 Chevalier Jean-Marie, et al., L’avenir énergétique : cartes sur table, Ed. Gallimard, 2012, pp. 20-99 Meadows Report,
    The Limits to Growth (last edition)

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Climate change is undoubtedly the main challenge of the 21st century. Achieving the Paris Agreement objectives imposes on the Humankind to think through the challenges and the opportunities raised by the transition towards a zero-carbon world by 2050. Already in 1972, the Meadows Report sounded the alarm that the economic development model set up as from the first industrial revolution ran the risk sooner or later to face the limits to economic and population growth. Ever since the ’80s, sustainable development seemed to be the answer to the Meadows Report. Recently, it has appeared that deep-reaching changes need to be undertaken and Humankind needs to go beyond the concept of “sustainable development” and thus rethink its own growth model. The current growth model is based mainly on energy intensive and polluting activities. Energy is the basis of all human activities. From the first industrial revolution onwards, it has been a determining factor in the development of the modern and contemporary society. However, although the energy sector has allowed Humankind to undergo major economic and social changes, it represents the most polluting activity on the planet. Limiting the climate change and its economic costs implies reviewing an energy model historically based on fossil fuels and deeply change the way our societies are built up. The main goal of the course is to assess the environmental, economic and social challenges as well as the opportunities of the transition towards a zero-carbon world and to understand the way stakeholders (national states versus non-state stakeholders – international & supranational organisations, local, companies, civil society etc.) will impact this transition.


    Topic

    Challenges of the Climate Change
    Basics of the Energy Sector
    Fossil versus Renewable Energies
    Opportunities and Economics of the Energy Transition
    Transitioning stakeholders – national, international & supranational organisations
    Transitioning stakeholders – non-state (I)
    Transitioning stakeholders – non-state (II)
    Energy system planning – methodological principles
    Energy scenarios – 1,5°C visions (I)
    Energy scenarios – 1,5°C visions (II)
    Megatrends & Uncertainties towards a zero-carbon world
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Books


    Antona, Philippe et alii, Mieux vivre à Toulouse après le pic du pétrole, http://www.toulouse-entransition.org/
    Association négaWatt, Manifeste NégaWatt : En route pour la transition énergétique !, Actes Sud, 2015
    Briens, François, La Décroissance au prisme de la modélisation prospective : Exploration macroéconomique d’une alternative paradigmatique, thèse de doctorat, 2016
    Chevalier, Jean-Marie, et alii, L’avenir énergétique : cartes sur table, Gallimard, 2012
    Chevalier, Jean-Marie, Les grandes batailles de l’énergie, Gallimard, 2012
    Caminel, Thierry et alii, Produire plus, polluer moins : l’impossible découplage ?, Les Petits Matins, 2014
    Carton, Hugo, Thevard, Benoit, Sinaï, Agnès, Freins et leviers des politiques de résilience locale en Europe, Institut Momentum, https://www.institutmomentum.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/11/R%c3%a9silience-locale-Momentum.pdf, 2013
    Hopkins, Rob, The Transition Handbook, Cambridge Ltd, 2014
    Meadows Report, The Limits to Growth (last edition)
    Morin, Jean-Frédéric, Orsini, Amandine, Politique internationale de l’environnement, Presses de Sciences Po, 2015

    Websites & e-Publications

    Bloomberg, https://www.bloomberg.com, (e.g. New Energy Outlook, Energy scenarios – last issues)
    British Petroleum, Energy Outlook (last issue)
    European Environmental Bureau, Decoupled Debunked,
    https://eeb.org/decoupling-debunked1/https://eeb.org/decoupling-debunked1/, 2019

    Europen Union, DG Energy / DG Clima,
    https://ec.europa.eu/energy/enhttps://ec.europa.eu/energy/en; https://ec.europa.eu/clima/index_fr

    Greenpeace, Energy Revolution, 2015
    International Energy Agency (IEA), https://www.iea.org/; (e.g. World Energy Outlook, Key World Energy Statistics – last issues etc.)
    International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), https://www.irena.org/
    Jakobson, Mark et alii, “100% Clean and Renewable Wind, Water, and Sunlight (WWS): All Sector Energy Roadmaps for 139 Countries of the World”,
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2542435117300120, 2017
    National Centers for Environmental Information (NOOA), State of the Climate (last issue),
    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/
    World Economic Forum (WEF), https://www.weforum.org

     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • BAPTISTE BIANCARDINI

  • Regional and Urban Economics

    Regional and Urban Economics

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students can understand how cities and regions change, how prices evolve in real-estate markets and how residential mobility and regional migration affects modern economies. They’re also able to evaluate local and regional public policies.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Active class participation is a main feature of the course’s organization. Students are also invited to make short presentations on different topics concerning regional and urban economics. A final exam evaluates the students. The final exam counts for 50% of the note. Short presentations count for another 50% of the note.


    Grading
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade.

    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    The course adopts a multidisciplinary approach in order to allow students from different scientific horizons to understand the functioning of regional and urban economies. Both micro and macroeconomic theoretical tools are used to explain how regional and urban economies evolve, how real-estate prices change, how firms and households behave when undertaking a locational or a residential quest. However, these tools are adapted to a large public of students in social sciences

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main theories of urban and regional economics. The course mainly focuses on the firms’ and households’ location theories, on the functioning of real estate and housing markets, but also on the new global challenges for cities and metropolitan areas. The course provides a theoretical framework in regional and urban economics but also addresses a series of empirical facts.


    Course structure

    Regions and cities in the history of economic thought.
    Cities in traditional economic theory, mercantilist and classical economic theory.
    The Marshallian paradigm
    History of cities
    From ancient settlements to global cities:
    How did cities evolve through the centuries?
    Location theories – the monocentric city
    The theory of Von Thunen. A microeconomic approach of location.
    Location theories – Location and firm competition
    The analysis of Weber and Hotelling.
    How firm competition deals with spatial analysis?
    Location theories – the central business district
    The analysis of Christaller and Losch
    The new urban theory paradigm.
    Suburbanization – measuring urban sprawl
    Definition, measure and analysis of urban sprawl
    Real-Estate markets: the land and housing competition
    Real estate markets – the new global patrimonial strategy
    Empirical facts: from location preferences to RB&B
    The global metropolis: the cities dominating the modern world
    The production of services
    Agglomeration economies and decision centers
    Regional migration and residential mobility
    The determinants of residential mobility
    Creative and cultural economies
    Local governments and regional policies
    The Tiebout paradigm.
    How policies affect city-size and city growth
    An urban future: the role of regional and urban planning
    Third world cities – the new frontiers
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    O’Sullivan (2014).
    Urban Economics, McGraw Hill, 9th Edition, 544 pages

    E. Glaeser (2011). Triumph of the city, Penguin Books, 2nd edition, 325 pages.
    S. Sassen (2001). The global city, New York, London, Tokyo, Princeton University Press, 2nd edition, 480 pages.
    R. Florida (2014), Atlas of cities, Princeton University Press, 256 pages.
    P. McCann (2013), Modern urban and regional economics, Oxford University Press, 432 pages.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
  • Data Analysis

    Data Analysis

    Ects : 6
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students are able to describe and present data, to summarize different types of variables, to analyze the relation between these variable, to practice regression and prediction, to cluster and compare different groups of observations. At the end of the course all students are quite familiar with the R environment.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Active class participation is a main feature of the course’s organization. Students work independently on real datasets with data analysis software. A final exam evaluates the students. The final exam is also on computer. The final exam counts for 50% of the note. Participation counts for another 50% of the note.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge on probabilities and statistics

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamental methods in Data analysis. This course aims to teach students how to present, analyze and interpret data by using the statistical analysis software package R. Following the course will help students to get familiar to the R ecosystem and learn how to use R for the most common data analysis’s projects.
    Topics include numerical and graphical summaries of data, qualitative and quantitative univariate analysis, bivariate analysis with the study of the links between two variables, analysis of variance, regression, principal components, factor analysis and cluster analysis.
    The course focuses on simple predictive analysis (linear regression or multidimensional analysis, factor approach, principal components approach). The courses take place in the computer lab in order to emphasize on practical aspects of data analysis. However, with the Covid 19 crisis, a distance course has been built allowing interactions with the students.


    Course structure

    Data visualization with a statistic software
    Descriptive statistics
    Sampling and statistical inference
    Analyzing relationships among two qualitative variables
    ANOVA
    Regression and prediction
    Time series
    Principal components analysis
    Correspondence analysis
    Clustering
    Application
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Heumann (2016),
    Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis, Springer, 455 pages

    J.L. Devore (2011),
    Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis, 4th Edition, 944 pages

    C. Judd (2017),
    Data Analysis, New Edition, 366 pages

    D.S Moore (2009),
    Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, Freeman, 690 pages

    ·Daniel J. Denis (2020),
    Univariate, Bivariate, and Multivariate Statistics Using R, Wiley, 384 pages

    Mustapha Abiodun Akinkunmi (2019),
    Business Statistics with Solutions in R, De Gruyter, 276 pages

    Christian Heumann, Michael Schomaker, et al. (2017),
    Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis: With Exercises, Solutions and Applications in R, Springer


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
  • History of economic thought

    History of economic thought

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Objective
    The class aims to familiarise students with the main currents in the history of economic thought embodied by their most important theorists from Aristotle to Keynes. Students having taken the class should retain, in particular, the key features of the main economic bodies of thought and their actual or potential relevance to major historical or current economic questions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Knowledge of the great currents in the history of economic thought and their principal representatives and major texts; at least cursory understanding of several basic building blocks of economic theory; some intuition for the assumptions and methodological choices that establish economics as an autonomous endeavour of research in the social sciences
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Final Exam (control of acquired notions, some multiple choice) 50 %
    Written Assignment 50% (the assigned papers can be prepared individually or in groups of two or three; the list of possible topics is attached below). The grade for the paper includes class attendance. Except for students with special exemptions, more than two unmotivated absences can lead to deductions.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of micro- and macroeconomics is desirable but not a must for students willing to familiarise themselves with a few key concepts during class.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    Following an introductory class on the methodology of economics and the conditions under which it might be considered a scientific endeavour akin to the natural sciences rather than a descriptive and hermeneutic endeavour akin to history or political science, the basic structure of the course is chronological (see plan below). Different theoretical approaches are presented in the context of their times and illustrated with simple numerical examples or diagrams that could also figure in introductory textbooks of micro- and macroeconomics. Wherever possible and pertinent, historical questions are linked to contemporary economic questions, e.g., Aristotle’s chrematistics and what constitutes a “good life”, Mandeville and the question of ethics in economics, mercantilism and modern trade disputes, the physiocrats and the question of natural resources, Ricardo and modern sources of rent, Marxism and the theory of crises, Veblen and the conspicuous consumption of leisure in the time of Facebook. Adam Smith, as the proponent of decentralised auto-organisation, the marginalists and Keynes remain, of course, directly relevant to modern economic issues in an all-pervasive and very direct manner.
    There are three further issues that might distinguish this class from other introductory classes to the history of economic thought. First, a particular emphasis is put on what we call the “economic subject”, i.e., the individual, entity, group or class, which defines the major economic issues and questions of the day and acts on them. In neoclassical economics, the economic subject is, of course, largely identical with the
    homo oeconomicus maximising individual utility. However, Aristotle, scholastic economic thought, mercantilism, the physiocrats, Marxism, institutionalism or even Keynes would have very different ideas about who constitutes the economic subject.
    Second, two classes are dedicated to Adam Smith as the founder of economics as an autonomous discipline independent of the other social sciences and a potentially scientific endeavour of research. We thus give space to the development in the
    Theory of Moral Sentiments of the anthropological foundations of the Smithian economic man, whose implications are then explored both at the micro and the macro level in the
    Wealth of Nations. This allows, in particular, a better understanding of the underlying assumptions behind the working of the invisible hand.
    Third, the class puts strong emphasis on the original writings (either in English or in English translation) of the key representatives of each current in the history of economic thought. While there are many competent historians of economic thought, nobody surpasses the writers who became “classics” in their ability to succinctly formulate ways forward out of the dilemmas posed by fundamental economic questions. Students will thus receive for each class by Email key chapters of the great economic texts as reading assignments. The decisive paragraphs will be read in class.


    Course structure

    Object and method of economic science
    Ethics, religion and economy in antiquity and the middle ages
    Moral, politics and Economics in the renaissance and mercantilism
    The political economy of the enlightened absolutism: the physiocrats
    Sympathy and wealth: Adam Smith and the
    homo oeconomicus
    Division of labour, value, and trade: Adam Smith Economist
    The classics: rent, distribution and growth in Say, Ricardo and Malthus
    Happiness or utility? The critique of liberal economy from Plato to Marx
    Individual optimization and general equilibrium: Walras and Jevons, Edgeworth and Pareto
    Increasing returns and competition in Alfred Marshall;
    Heterodox economic thinkers (Veblen, Schumpeter, Hayek)
    Keynes and the making of macroeconomics
    Final exam
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Object and method of economic science: Milton Friedman (1953), “The Methodology of Positive Economics” in
    Essays in Positive Economics. Karl Popper (1935),
    The Logic of Scientific Discovery, Part I “Introduction to the Logic of Science”.

    Ethics, religion and economy in antiquity and the middle ages: Plato,
    The Laws, Chapters 5 and 9. Aristotle,
    Nicomachean Ethics, Book V. Aristotle,
    Politics, Book 1, Chapters 8-12. Thomas Aquinas,
    Summa teologica, Questions 77 – 78.

    Moral, politics and Economics in the renaissance and mercantilism Thomas Hobbes (1660),
    The Leviathan, “Of the Nutrition and Procreation of A Commonwealth”. John Locke (1690),
    The Second Treatise of Civil Government, Ch. 5 “Of Property” Bernard Mandeville (1714),
    The Fable of the Bees: Or Private Vices, Public Benefits, “The Grumbling Hive: Or Knaves Turned Honest”.

    The political economy of the enlightened absolutism: the physiocrats: François Quesnay (1759),
    Economic Table.

    Sympathy and wealth: Adam Smith and the
    homo oeconomicus: Adam Smith (1759),
    The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Selected passages.

    Division of labour, value, and trade: Adam Smith Economist. Adam Smith (1776),
    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Book I “Of the Causes of Improvement in the Productive Power of Labour”.

    The classics: rent, distribution and growth in Say, Ricardo and Malthus David Ricardo (1817),
    Of the Principles of Political Economy and Trade, Chapters 1, 2 and 7 “On Value”, “On Rent” and “On Foreign Trade”.

    Happiness or utility? The critique of the liberal economy from Plato to Marx. Karl Marx (1867),
    Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Vol. I, Book I, Part 1 “Commodities and Money”

    Individual optimization and general equilibrium: Walras and Jevons, Edgeworth and Pareto. William Stanley Jevons (1871),
    Theory of Political Economy, Ch 4 “Theory of Exchange”.

    Increasing returns and competition in Alfred Marshall; Heterodox economic thinkers (Veblen, Schumpeter, Hayek): Alfred Marshall (1890),
    Principles of Economics, Book V, Ch. 12, “Equilibrium of Normal Demand and Supply, Continued, with Reference to the Law of Increasing Return”. Thorstein Veblen (1899),
    Theory of the Leisure Class, Chapters 2-4 “Pecuniary Emulation”, “Conspicuous Leisure”, “Conspicuous Consumption”.

    Keynes and the making of macroeconomics: John Maynard Keynes (1936),
    The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, Chapter 3 “The Principle of Effective Demand”.


    The class does not use a single textbook. Students, who wish to do so, can receive the teaching notes (in French) upon request. As a first point of entry, other than the original texts, are recommended the individual entries on authors, movements or concepts in
    The New Palgrave: Dictionary of Economics (1987), Edited by Peter Newman, John Eatwell and Murray Milgate, London, Macmillan. Please also use The History of economic thought Website,
    http://www.hetwebsite.net/het/; McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought,
    https://socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca/econ/ugcm/3ll3/; Online Library of Liberty: A collection of scholarly works about individual liberty and free markets, http://oll.libertyfund.org/.


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No

    Enseignant responsable :

    • JAN-HORST KEPPLER

  • Globalization

    Globalization

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, students are able to analyze the main features of the economic globalization process but also the way such a process affects modern economic business life. The students develop also a keen analysis on anti-globalization movements and policies in order to understand the contradictory social and political movements in most OECD economies.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Active class participation is a main feature of the course’s organization. Students have to make short presentations on different issues concerning economic globalization. A final exam evaluates the students. The final exam counts for 50% of the note. Short presentations count for another 50% of the note.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
     
    Pré-requis recommandés :
    Prerequisites
    The course is open to all students from social sciences. No specific prerequisites are needed but a general culture about modern economies and the international environment are appreciated. The course is adapted to a large public of students in social sciences.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The aim of this course is to help students understand the economic globalization process and its consequences, both from an economic and political point of view. The course focuses on the determinants and the consequences of economic globalization, but also on the new growth and sustainable development challenges. It also examines the rising of anti-globalization movements and theories.


    Course Structure

    Globalization: a definition from an economic, sociological and cultural point of view / The anti-globalization movement: from Trump to Brexit and the rebirth of nationalism
    The globalization: origins and main actors / The after WW2 period. The changing 1990s. Multinational firms structure the world.
    Economic globalization and the role of the developing countries / The development of the East-West relations and the South south relations. / The 2008 Crisis
    Economic globalization and growth / Theoretical issues / The role of Foreign Direct Investment
    Poverty and world inequalities / Measuring poverty and economic development / Understanding the new world disparities
    China: the Rostow paradigm / The determinants of the Chinese growth / The importance of world economic openness
    When old growth models become history / The end of productivity gains / The end of mass consumption / The end of investment and public spending multiplier effect
    Monetary and banking globalization / The new banking empires / The monetary agreements / The global debth problem
    Migration / A new migration era / The migrants crisis
    From globalization to sustainable development / Poverty issues / Environment and the solutions for a sustainable development
    The return of the anti-globalization defenders / Perspectives and threats
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    A. Scott (2013). The limits of globalization, Routledge, 345 pages.
    D. Guthrie (2012). China and globalization, Taylor & Francis, 360 pages.
    P. Stearns (2016). Globalization in world history second edition, Routledge, 202 pages.

    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    No
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • MICHAIL DIMOU

Social Sciences & Law

  • Hezbollah. Reinventing the Relationship between Islam, Armed Struggle, and Politics

    Hezbollah. Reinventing the Relationship between Islam, Armed Struggle, and Politics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    At the end of the course, the students enrolled will have an advanced understanding of
    (1) Hezbollah’s nature, goals, practices and history,
    (2) the notion of militancy in contexts of violence,
    (3) the main differences between major Islamic and jihadist movements,
    (4) a critical notion of foreign intervention, peacemaking, peacebuilding, state building, reconciliation, and transitional justice.
     
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Grading is as follows: participation (10%) – book reports (2*30% = 60%) – final exam (40%).

    Each student is expected to submit
    two book reports. Each paper, of 2 000 words, should not only summarize the content of the assigned text, but also—and more importantly—assess the author’s arguments critically, draw out the reading’s relevance to the themes of the course.
    The
    final exam – writing a paper on a subject chosen among two possible choices submitted by the instructor (3h exam) will take place at the end of the semester. The grading will be based on the quality of the quality of the analysis, and the relevance of the examples used to illustrate the argument.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.

     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    No prerequisite required.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    More than thirty years after its foundation, Lebanese Hezbollah remains an organization difficult to understand. An Islamist terrorist group dedicated to destroying Israel or the first Arab national Resistance to have ever defeated Tel-Aviv's troops, a patriotic and respectable party or a fascist network having managed to control all levers of Lebanese political life... what exactly is Hezbollah? How did it acquire such an important role in Lebanese politics? How are the latest socio-political transformations of the Middle East affecting it, and how does it impact the Middle East in return?
    This class has three purposes.
    (1) It first gives an articulated definition of Hezbollah, presenting a thorough history of the party, describing its well-built internal structure, and the large scope of its social and political action;
    (2) It then explains the evolution of the party's mobilization;
    (3) Finally, it illustrates another path, political but mainly identity-related, that of the Shiite community, today the main constituent of Lebanese society.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    For an introduction to the Lebanese historical and political universe, see:
    - SALIBI, Kamal,
    A
    House of Many Mansions, University of California Press, 1990, 247 p.;
    – TRABOULSI, Fawwaz,
    A History of Modern Lebanon, Pluto Press, 2012.

    They should be complemented with:
    - HANF, Theodor,
    Coexistence in Wartime Lebanon, London, Tauris, 2013, 712 p.
    - FISK, Robert,
    Pity the Nation, New York, Thunder’s Mouth Press, 2002, 752 p.
    - HAUGBOLLE, Sune
    , War and Memory in Lebanon, Cambridge University Press, 2012, 280 p.
    - SCHIFF, Ze’ev, YA’ARI, Ehoud,
    Israel’s Lebanon War, Simon and Schuster, 1985, 320 p.

    For the events of 2005 and onwards:
    - YOUNG, Michael,
    The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Simon & Schuster, 2010, 336 p.
    - BLANDFORD, Nicholas,
    Killing Mr. Lebanon, IB Tauris, 2006, 544 p.

    On Hezbollah:
    - DAHER Aurélie,
    Hezbollah. Mobilization and Power, Hurst/Oxford University Press, 2019
    – HAMZEH, Nizar,
    In the Path of Hizbullah, Syracuse University Press, 2004, 242 p.
    - NORTON, Augustus Richard,
    Hezbollah. A Short Story, Princeton University Press, 2007, 216 p.
    - PALMER HARIK, Judith,
    Hezbollah. The Changing Face of Terrorism, I.B. Tauris, 2004, 256 p.
    And for an internal presentation by the party’s vice-secretary general:
    - QASSEM, Naim,
    Hizbullah. The Story from Within, Saqi Books, 2010, 464 p.

    Lebanese news can be followed by reading the dailies (English versions):
    -
    Al-Nahar (naharnet): pro-March 14 -
    The Daily Star: pro-March 14 -
    al-Akhbar: pro-March 8
    -
    as-Safir: Leftist.
     

    Enseignant responsable :

    • Aurélie DAHER

  • European Economic Law

    European Economic Law

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Knowledge of the main Treaty provisions and case law concerning the four market freedoms
    Understanding of the legal specificities of European market integration
    Understanding of the challenges for European and national legal orders raised by the European market integration processes
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    50% group presentation, written test and participation
    50% final written exam

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge in law (even only national) and in economics.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    European economic law focusses on the EU rules regulating the states and private firms operating in the single market. The European Economic Law course covers the central aspects of European Market Law : the four fundamental freedoms contained in the Treaty of Rome but also more recent areas of European economic integration : European tax policy, monetary and capital union. The course is interactive and encourages students to actively participate in their own and others’ learning experience, to undertake collaborative group work and personal research.

    Objectives:
    The aim of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of European economic integration and its current challenges, through an overview of the fundamental rules constructing and regulating the European internal market.


    Course structure

    From the European Economic Community to the European Union
    Brainstorming and group formation

    The main institutions economic regulation

    Free movement of goods and tariff barriers

    Free movement of goods and the regulation of NTBS

    Competition Law 1 / 101 TFEU and the regulation of cartels and vertical agreements

    Competition Law 2/ Article 102 TFEU and the regulation of dominant positions

    Competition Law 3/ The regulation of European mergers and acquisitions

    Free movement of persons and services

    Freedom of establishment and company law harmonisation

    Lecture: Towards a European Capital Union

    Lecture: EU Tax Policy

    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    http://europa.eu/european-union/index_enhttp://europa.eu/european-union/index_en
    and the institutions’ own websites
    https://www.euractiv.com/https://www.euractiv.com/
    https://www.touteleurope.eu/https://www.touteleurope.eu/
    John Fairhurst,
    Law of the European Union, 11/E, ISBN-10: 1292090332 • ISBN-13: 9781292090337©2016 • Pearson • Paper, 872 pp Published 05 Apr 2016

    Penelope Kent,
    Blueprints: EU Law, SBN-10: 1408279029 • ISBN-13: 9781408279021©2014 • Pearson • Paper, 432 p, Published 03 Jul 2014
    https://www.vitalsource.com/en-uk/referral?term=9781408279045https://www.vitalsource.com/en-uk/referral?term=9781408279045
    Iyiola Solanke,
    EU Law, ISBN-10: 1408228335 •Pearson • Paper, 584 pp, Published 21 May 2015,
    https://www.vitalsource.com/enhttps://www.vitalsource.com/en
    Studies in European Economic Law and Regulation, Series Editors: Purnhagen, Kai, van Zeben, Josephine, Springer


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • Les sciences sociales à la française de Montesquieu à Piketty

    Les sciences sociales à la française de Montesquieu à Piketty

    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    Connaissance générale des grands auteurs et des disciplines académiques étudié
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation
    L’évaluation sera réalisée sur la participation en cours, un exposé en cours d’année et un examen final.
    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.

    Intégrité académique
    Soyez conscient des règles de l'Université Paris Dauphine sur le plagiat et la tricherie lors des examens. Tout le travail effectué pour ce cours doit être votre propre travail, ou celui de votre propre groupe. Travailler en tant que membre d'un groupe implique que vous êtes un participant actif et que vous contribuez pleinement à la production produite par ce groupe.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Le cours se déroulera en français ; les questions et réponses pourront avoir lieu en anglais.
    Capacité à faire des fiches de synthèse sur un thème / auteur et à les présenter à l’oral.
     

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Ce cours a pour but de présenter le contenu, les enjeux et les lignes de force des sciences sociales telles qu’elles sont pratiquées en France. Par sciences sociales, on entend les sciences qui traitent des phénomènes sociaux, par opposition aux sciences de la nature. C’est le sens notamment de la formulation “agrégation de sciences sociales”. Ces sciences incluent notamment les disciplines suivantes : économie, sociologie, anthropologie, science politique, histoire, démographie, ethnographie. La psychanalyse se positionne surtout au niveau de l’individu et son cas sera simplement brièvement abordé dans l’introduction générale. Ces disciplines ne se pratiquent pas dans un huis clos national et des incursions seront faites à l’étranger en tant que de besoin ; la France est ici conçue comme un carrefour d’influences, développant au passage des caractéristiques spécifiques. L’ensemble est présenté de manière chronologique et thématique, en s’appuyant principalement sur les grands auteurs.

    Plan du cours


    Séance
    Sujet

    Introduction ; les précurseurs (Montesquieu, Tocqueville, Pareto...)
    Marx en France, de 1848 à nos jours
    Max Weber et la sociologie compréhensive; les wébériens français
    Emile Durkheim, les durkheimiens et la sociologie quantitative
    Claude Lévi-Strauss et l’anthropologie; universalistes et particularistes; Latour, Héritier, Descola
    Pierre Bourdieu et ses ramifications
    L’histoire: les Annales, la socio-histoire, Foucault, Duby, Noiriel...
    L’ethnographie et la démographie. La famille comme unité d’analyse.
    L’économie et les mathématiques, des physiocrates à nos jours
    La science politique: une définition par son objet, une réinvention des méthodes
    Thomas Piketty, une nouvelle ambition de synthèse
    Examen final

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Non

     

  • Law and Society

    Law and Society

    Ects : 6

Electives

  • Pop Art

    Pop Art

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    By the end of the course, students should have acquired in-depth knowledge about the Pop Art movement and many of its leading artists. They should be able to set its emergence in the context of other art movements or trends. Improving students' ability to describe and comment on artworks in an informed, critical way is promoted throughout the course, whether orally or in writing through class presentations and essays. A group visit to a museum and / or art gallery will enhance students' understanding of the role of these institutions.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Class mark 50%: Oral presentations, a written class test on specific artworks, and active class participation. (More details given in class on the relative share in the marking of these various activities).

    Final exam: 50%

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    An intermediate level in English proficiency is recommended.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The course focuses on the emergence and development of the Pop Art movement (1950s to 1970s) in the United Kingdom and the United States, giving background on the historical and aesthetic contexts such as the dominant art movements or social changes of the times. It will explore a selection of Pop artworks that focused on the new consumer society and its media, and used them as their subject. The materials, techniques and formal styles of their creations will be analyzed. Whether the artists chose to celebrate or criticize their newfound muse will be discussed. The course will also look at the art production associated to the Pop Art movement in other countries than the United Kingdom and the United States, as recent exhibitions (
    The World Goes Pop at The Tate Modern, or
    International Pop at the Walker Art Center) have shown a less canonized approach to Pop Art. Finally, “Pop Art” understood in its larger meaning of “Pop Culture” will allow for a brief introduction to “Pop architecture” (Archigram, for instance), or cult movies drawing on pop imagery (
    Barbarella for instance).

    The course aims at giving keys to understanding the emergence of the Pop Art movement and its interaction with culture and society, providing students with knowledge about artists and art history in general. The course aims at enriching students' writing and speaking skills by focusing on the expression of argumentation and value judgment in an informed and critical way. The course also aims at developing students' creative skills through a visual project at the end of the semester.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    Texts by art critics and interviews of artists will be given in class or through MyCourse.

    A bibliography on Andy Warhol and on the Pop Art movement will be given through MyCourse, along with the address of the public libraries in Paris that hold the books


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
    Yes
  • International Business Ethics

    International Business Ethics

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Course Objectives
    This course was especially designed as an accelerated learning platform for students destining themselves for a career in upper management or higher responsibilities in other fields, seeking to gain a personal understanding of the concepts and logics underpinning ethical business practices. Students will gain theoretical insight into ethical philosophies and correlate these with relevant managerial imperatives in business decisions. They will also develop a professional skill-set with ethical value orientations and a prioritization of decision parameters. This will help them better define their own ethical management style, expressing vision and a unique leadership philosophy.


    Learning Outcomes
    Students will have the opportunity to deepen their intellectual understanding of ethics, and its growing role in business organizations. They will acquire the ability to assess ethical values at work within management decisions and analyze their empowerment in business methodologies. The more advanced achievers will structure key values into the business process, and creatively combine vital organizational goals with clear ethical orientations. Most students will gain a broad understanding of the stakes of ethics in international business, and be better able to contribute responsibly to achieving future employers’ objectives in a distinctly ethical managerial capacity


    Course Structure

    Presentation of course objectives and outline of learning requirements. Introduction to value empowerment in business decision making and its relevance to management style and the development of leadership skills.
    Overview of embedded issues in international business ethics and their pertinence to business orientations and management prerogatives. Ethics in relation to law, to broader social imperatives and forms of regulation.
    Ethics quiz and discussions of ethical analysis and behavioral modeling. Theoretical overview of values, attitudes and behavioral characterization. Utility and limitations of social psychology in ethical behavioral analysis.
    Review of the larger schools of thought in ethical theory and discussion of the pros and cons of each type of logical structuring of ethical philosophy.
    The historical evolution of business ethics within corporate organizations.
    1st case study focused on ethical perceptions as characterized by prior value orientations. Discussion of situational assessments and consequent implications for ethical decision-making. Value defined image analysis.
    History of Ethics, Archaic Greek competition theory and emergence of autonomous moral philosophy. Correlation of Sophist relativism with modern competitive theory and early sources of cooperative behavior.
    Class analysis of a 2nd case with ethical reengineering within a company pursuant to class action lawsuits and loss of reputation. Discussion of the issues of ethics versus compliance in the legal context of business ethics.
    History of Ethics, investigation into the fundamental insight contributed by Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. How to determine the source of values, understand what role for virtues, and define human social organizations.
    Theoretical interpretation of Hellenic period ethics in a modern context. 3rd case study examining complex international business ethics criteria.
    Comparison of Buddhist ethics, Islamic Business Ethics, worldview definition from philosophy to ethical choice of roles and action modes. Student presentations of independent research on chosen ethical topics.
    Kantian principles of Universalizability, Duty and Respect as correlated to modern Corporate Social Responsibility and awareness of Stakeholders. Student presentations of research on chosen ethical topics.
    Final Exam
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode of Assessment
    Required case study preparation, class discussion participation and independent research.
    Graded 50% for collaborative group presentations and 50% for the individual final exam.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.


    Academic integrity
    Be aware of the rules in Université Paris Dauphine about plagiarism and cheating during exams. All work turned in for this course must be your own work, or that of your own group. Working as part of a group implies that you are an active participant and fully contributed to the output produced by that group.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International students are expected to have an initial awareness of ethics in the field of business, and to be at minimum at the stage of problem finding, with respect the place of ethics in society at large, as well as in business and commerce. They aim to actively develop their understanding of ethics in management philosophy and hone their ethical business decision-making skills. They agree to participate in class debates and conduct independent research on a specific ethical topic.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Overview
    This course was created to grant international students’ insight into the responsibilities incumbent to high level decision making. With theoretical learning and practical applications, it is designed to prepare business students to the ethical dimensions of careers in middle or upper management.
    Students are called upon to set their own learning objectives, as well as skill development goals. They will be expected to harness abstract concepts and apply them to practical business contexts. Teaching is through thematic lectures, focused class discussions and simulated case study debate.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Christoph Lütge (ed.) - 2013 - Heidelberg: Springer.

    A Defence of Philosophical Business Ethics. Roger Crisp - 2003 - In William H. Shaw (ed.),
    Ethics at Work: Basic Readings in Business Ethics, Oxford University Press. Pp. 9–25

    Beyond Empiricism: Realizing the Ethical Mission of Management. Julian Friedland - 2012 -
    Business and Society Review 117 (3):329-356

    Institutionalization of Organizational Ethics Through Transformational Leadership. Dawn S. Carlson & Pamela L. Perrewe - 1995 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):829-838.

    The Sound of Silence – A Space for Morality? The Role of Solitude for Ethical Decision Making. Kleio Akrivou, Dimitrios Bourantas, Shenjiang Mo & Evi Papalois - 2011 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):119-133.

    Responsible Leadership in Global Business: A New Approach to Leadership and its Multi-Level Outcomes. [REVIEW] Christian Voegtlin, Moritz Patzer & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2012 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):1-16.

    Real Corporate Responsibility.
    Eric Palmer - 2004 - In John Hooker & Peter Madsen (eds.),
    International Corporate Responsibility Series. Carnegie Mellon University Press. pp. 69-84

    Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function. Michael C. Jensen - 2002 -
    Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):235-256

    Innovation and Ethics, Ethical Considerations in the Innovation Business. Yves Fassin - 2000 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):193-203

    A Right to Work and Fair Conditions of Employment. Kory Schaff - 2017 - In
    Fair Work: Ethics, Social Policy, Globalization. London: Rowman and Littlefield, Intl. pp. 41-55

    Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures. Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach - 2004 -
    Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103-119


    MyCourse
    This course is on MyCourse:
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    Enseignant responsable :

    • RICHARD OREN

  • The Environmental Imagination: Representing nature in visual arts (fine art, film, documentaries) and literature

    The Environmental Imagination: Representing nature in visual arts (fine art, film, documentaries) and literature

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

    Learning outcomes
    The students will learn about many different artistic, filmic and literary genres and their evolution over time, as well as focus on specific artists and movements that are landmarks in the study of the representation of nature. Improving students' ability to describe and comment on artworks in an informed, critical way is promoted throughout the course, whether orally or in writing through class presentations and response essays.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    Group presentations, Response essays, Final exam
    Class participation will be taken into account

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    None, but an intermediate level of English is recommended.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN 2020-2021

    Course description and objectives
    The aim of the course is to introduce students to the various artistic, filmic and literary means used in the representation of nature and the environment in art, literature, fiction film and documentaries. The course will introduce students to different periods, media and genres, ranging from early cave painting to the cinema of eco-disaster or apocalyptic futurism, exploring various genres (Pastoralism, Romanticism and the Sublime, Ecopoetics…), themes or motifs (Animals in fiction, Landscapes, Skies, …), artistic movements (Impressionism, Land Art…) or material and techniques. The different modes of relationship or interaction between humans and/in nature, and the aims and use of those representations of nature will often be at the center of discussions: how do those representations create meaning, values and emotional responses, especially in the understanding of the “human” and the “natural”.

    Courses Objectives:
    At a time of Earth’s sixth mass extinction, in a period of climate change, humans’ relationship to their environment and other living beings is at the center of many debates in all fields. The course aims at bringing students to some of the many artistic and literary traditions in the representation of the “natural” world, their shifts in discourses and techniques, and the wide range of value and meaning they create about the understanding of the relationship between the “human” and the “natural”, as well as the various level of importance, types of visibility and voice these visual artworks give to the “natural” world and environment.


    Course structure

    Introduction to the class - Cave painting & its impact on artists from XIXth to XXIst centuries – Representations of the creation of Cosmos
    Nature as garden: Pastoralism - Arcadia - Some symbols of Nature in Classical paintings
    Mapping the world: Naturalist representations / Still Lifes / The invention of landscape
    Nature as wilderness –The Romantic Gaze and the Sublime
    The quest for wilderness (ex: Grizzli Man (Herzog) / Into the Wild (Sean Penn))
    Conquering the West - The Western genre and its evolution (film and literature)
    Impressionism: leaving the studio – the study of light. Pointillism
    Land Art
    Nature as raw material in Art [ex: Fire (Yves Klein) - Chemical reactions (Hicham Berrada), etc.] - Recycling nature, using waste - Gleaning
    Giving voice to nature: Writing for an endangered world / Eco-poetics / Eco-art
    Artificial nature - Tech-dreams of nature and the environment: (ex: Avatar / Matrix…)
    The cinema and literature of Eco disaster / Moving out from Earth
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Excerpts from various relevant texts will be provided.

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  • Material Culture

    Material Culture

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    By looking at the diversity of material forms, students will gain an appreciation for the ways that “things” help us to connect to the world and see it in a new way, and the ways “things” give meaning to our lives and the lives of those around us.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading

    One oral presentation (on one of the 10 topics listed below)
    One mid-term quiz
    One final exam

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites

    open-minded attitude regarding general interest topics
    reasonably fluent in written and oral English (B2 level)
    familiar with the general requirements for academic presentations
    able to attend all sessions, including the final exam

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The study of material culture centers upon objects, the materials that they are made of, and the ways in which they provide an understanding of cultural and social relations. Over the last 20 years, the human and social sciences have taken a “material turn” with a new focus on the study of objects in their physical reality as a way of giving meaning to and explaining the economic, social and symbolic world. This study will explore the intertwined, and often dialectic, relationships between people and things.

    Material culture, which Michel de Certeau once praised as “the history of everday life”, has taken a newfound interest in the expression of the human subject through his/her objects, stimulating thoughts on the uses of such objects, as well as the affects and values they form (Baudrillard, Système des objets).

    The ever-changing world of material culture has recently taken an interest in interactions between the object and it user or consumer. In this aspect, the recent American initiative BND (Buy Nothing Day) was born out of society's questioning of the power of goods and, more generally, the new relationship emerging between being and having in this era of globalized consumption.

    This course will examine concrete cases, enriched through an interdisciplinary approach.

    A new consideration will be given to the vast corpus of different object worlds that we constantly experience. From food to fashion, to toys and smart phones, the aim is to make objects talk and also understand what they are telling (of) us.

    Objectives:
    Material culture examines the relationships between people and things.
    The aim of this class is to introduce some accessible approaches to this exciting and new field of academic enquiry, which crosses disciplinary boundaries.
    Students will become acquainted with the kinds of objects that are considered in the study of material culture. The course will also provide an opportunity to practice communication skills and develop confidence in delivering presentations in English on material culture topics, maximizing the effective use of visual aids.
    Some questions we will explore include: how is the value or significance of objects created in different social contexts? Should we understand items of material culture as ways of fulfilling human needs? Or rather as symbols that "say" something about their users, and if so, what?


    Course structure

    Introduction to Material Culture
    (Methodology & Class assessments)

    Of People and Smartphones: A Culture of (Dis)connection

    The 3 R’s: “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”
    Waste Management and Recycled Materials
    Minimalism: A Documentary about the Important Things, by Joshua Fields Milburn & Ryan Nicodemus

    Political & Propaganda Artifacts
    Promoting Ideas Through Things

    The Use of Pictures
    Photography as Objects in the Digital Age

    Patchwork as an Art Form: Why Quilts Matter

    Fashion as Dress, Image and Practice

    The Cult(ure) of Food
    From Still Life to Food Porn

    Dolls
    Playthings, Transitional Objects, Social Agents

    Why Collecting?

    Jewelry
    Displays of Personal Adornment and Body Art

    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography
    ·Jean Baudrillard,
    Système des objets, 1968.
    ·Victor Buchli,
    The Material Culture Reader, 2013.

    Michel de Certeau,
    L’invention du quotidien, 1980.

    Marie-Pierre Julien et Céline Rosselin,
    La culture matérielle, 2005.

    Daniel Miller,
    Stuff, 2009 et
    Consumption and Its Consequences, 2013.

    ·Paul R. Mullins,
    The Archaeology of Consumer Culture, 2012.

    Christopher Tilley,
    The Handbook of Material Culture, 2013.

    Ian Woodward,
    Understanding Material Culture, 2007.


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  • opportunities and challenges for journalism

    opportunities and challenges for journalism

  • Cross-cultural Communication and Management

    Cross-cultural Communication and Management

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Our cross-cultural management course is designed to:

    Offer an insight and understanding of how cross cultural and intercultural issues manifest in the workplace,
    Develop skills and approaches to deal with cross cultural and intercultural issues such as communication, conflict resolution and decision making.
    Provide guidance on how to leverage cultural differences and maximize the potential of a multicultural team.
    Offer an insight of how to adapt “universal” management tools to local cultural contexts.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Grading
    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade.

    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.  
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Organization theory

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The increasing significance of the multinational enterprise (MNE) in the world economy has resulted in the importance of understanding not only MNEs as such, but also the actions of people working within these and similar multi-cultural organisations. This reality places demands on managers’ soft skills based on cultural knowledge and awareness. A key challenge will be to make the utmost of the cultural diversity of your staff, by fostering creativity instead of suppressing or ignoring differences.

    Cross-Cultural Management (CCM) draws on research from several different disciplines such as international management, organisational behaviour, sociology, anthropology, ethnology and psychology. The CCM course will build on these various disciplines both in the content of the lectures and workshops but also in a group assignment.

    The intention of the CCM course is to introduce you to some of this research in the context of working as a manager within a MNE, a multi-cultural organisation or as part of an international alliance or joint - venture. Cross-cultural management has developed under the influence of distinct paradigms.

    We will focus on two main perspectives with their own assumptions, methodologies and implications for practice:

    A first group of studies adopting a cross-national comparison perspective tend to investigate the variation across nations of managerial behaviour.
    A second group of studies tends to focus on intercultural interactions to investigate processes and practices linked to culture.

    Course structure

    Introduction: How culture has been debated in management literature.
    Cross national comparison perspective: ( Geert Hofstede, Edward T.Hall).
    Interpretive studies initiated by the work of d'Iribarne (1989) in the stream of cross-national comparison ( France/ US).
    Cross cultural studies with an intercultural interaction focus: Film: A French- Japanese cooperation
    Organizational culture and national culture: The case of Lafarge
    Intercultural Communication
    Intercultural Conflict
    IHRM: Multicultural teams and diversity in the workplace
    IHRM: Expatriation
    Culture and Strategy
    Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
    Final Exam

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Prescribed text book: Iribarne, Philippe (d’) and Alain Henry (2007), Successful Companies in the Developing World: Managing the Synergy with Culture, Notes et documents AFD.


    Other references:
    Schneider, Susan, Barsoux, Jean Louis (1997), Managing across Cultures, Prentice Hall Europe.
    Usinier, Jean Claude (2002), International and Cross-Cultural Management Research, SAGE Series in Management Research.
    Hofstede, Geert (1984). Culture’s Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values (abr. edition). Beverly Hills: Sage Publications
    Primecz, Henriett, Romani, Laurence and Sackmann, Sonja (2009), “Multiple perspectives in Cross-Cultural Management”, International Journal of Cross-Cultural Management, 9, 3, 267-274.


    Additional resources may include a variety of print & visual resources, handouts along with class PPTs .


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  • Capstone

    Capstone

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes

    To improve skills in writing, oral presentation and research
    To recognize, explain, and juxtapose academic arguments within the context of students’ own research
    To evaluate competing positions in academic debates and to use evidence-based arguments to develop and defend their own position
    To conduct and respond to criticism through peer-review.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Capstone project is graded according to norms of academic quality.

    Assignment # 1 : 15%
    Assignment # 2 : 10%
    Assignment # 3 : 10%
    Assignment # 4 : 15%
    Assignment # 5 : 50%

    Percentages could be changed after discussion with home universities.

    Capstone products are mainly conducted in English, yet students with a good ability in French can, on a case by case basis, conduct the project in French (if accepted by the home institutions).

    Capstone projects can be focused on an academic research topic, a firm project, a university question.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Students are required to work in small groups, advised by a specialist, in order to conduct a high-quality research project. Depending on the project's complexity, students will work individually or in small teams on a problem statement (in coordination with home universities).

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    The Capstone is defined as a client-oriented group research project, based on original field research which generates a deliverable product. The Capstone project is designed to demonstrate students accumulated training in a single original project, subject to the instructor’s approval and under the additional supervision of a faculty mentor.
    Although the most common way of completing this course is the writing of a research thesis of approximately 8000 words, alternate projects can be explored in consultation with the instructor of the course (and home universities).
    The completed thesis or project should bring together a theme, a region, a foreign language expertise (sometime), and an overseas experience (most of the time). The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from the instructor, peers and mentor.

    Objectives:
    By the end of the seminar students will be able to clearly articulate their research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.


    Course structure

    There is one class meeting at the beginning of the semester to explain the organization.

    Week 3: Assignment # 1: Proposal
    The outline should address the following: (1) your thesis topic – choose a preliminary topic; (2) why your topic is important; and (3) why you should be the one to write this project.

    Week 5: Assignment # 2: Expanded & Revised Research Statement
    This assignment should introduce the reader to the main aspects of your thesis and formulate your research questions. It should set the stage for the next phase of your thesis in the following manner: State what the project is about, what you hope to demonstrate, the significance of the project, how did this idea come about (optional), what kind of sources / theoretical framework will you be using to analyze your questions (also provide a preliminary evaluation of the sources you will be using), introduce a preliminary plan of your study including an initial division into sections/chapters.
    Length: 750-1000 words.

    Week 7: Assignment # 3: Literature Review / Theoretical Background if relevant.
    This assignment may draw from the content of your proposal but it has to be significantly expanded upon feedback received. Having compiled and read the appropriate bibliography, or most of it, you should now be able to provide the background for your topic, applying broad and narrow perspectives. Some of the questions that should guide you when you are researching/compiling your literature review are: 1. What has been done thus far in the field? 2. Do you see any trends or shifts in the study of your topic? 3. What methodologies and approaches were applied? For example, the issue was handled by such and such in his work… where he explored x (but not y); … there’s a lacuna here and there; scholars relied too much on statistical analysis and less on oral testimonies; used theory a but not b; ignored or over-emphasized a comparative analysis, used one group/type of sources but not another, did or did not account for the bias in the sources used, etc. etc.
    Length: 1500-2000 words.

    Week 9: Assignment # 4: Case Study/Analysis of your data
    Here you provide all the details of your actual study. This is the part of the thesis you will be most familiar with. Analyze and discuss your data in relation to the main question you proposed and taking into consideration the literature you discussed and juxtaposed in your Literature Review. This is the part of your thesis that you zoom in the actual region/country/area you are interested in and discuss the relevance of the data in broader questions. We will discuss this assignment further in class.
    Length: 2000-2500 words.

    Complete Rough Draft with Conclusions and an Executive Summary
    Although this is not the final product, treat the rough draft as if it were. Structure your paper with titled sections, integrating your previous assignments into a single essay, expanding and altering them as needed. Pay attention also to editorial concerns (style, footnotes, etc., per our Style Sheet). In your conclusion, summarize the major points of the thesis, reflect upon relevant parts from the literature review, and indicate, if applicable, recommendations for further inquiry, be it of a scholarly or policy-related nature.


    No compulsory: Project presentation. You are required to submit an abstract to present your project. Plan a 15-minute talk, guiding the audience through the contents of your work. Pay attention to form and style. Your presentation should be professional, informative, clear and concise.

    The time and date of the oral presentation will be decided with the tutor, instructor and students.

    Week12: Assignment # 5: Final Paper with revised conclusions and executive summary. You should revise your rough draft several times before submitting the final version. Historically, poor marks occurred mostly because students did not heed to the advice and comments on the rough drafts. Your final paper should be professional and ready for publication.
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
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  • Sport

    Sport

    Ects : 3
    Volume horaire : 18
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    You will be evaluated, in each activity, through the following areas:

    Your physical performance (continuous or final exam depending on the activity);
    The knowledge provided by the teacher during the course (evaluation in the form of a file and knowledge testing at the end of the semester);
    Your progress and your commitment.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on quality of comments, not quantity.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    Home institution’s authorization to transfer credits.
    Students must be able to practice a physical activity (not of incapacity, long-term injury ...)

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    Students can attend sport practice and get credits for this class. Students will need to have their home institution’s authorization to transfer credits and register for these classes.

    Students can register for one of the following sports:
    • Badminton (mixed)
    • Basketball (mixed)
    • French boxing (mixed)
    • Coaching form (mixed)
    • Dance (mixed)
    • Climbing (mixed)
    • Football (women)
    • Football (men)
    • Golf (mixed)
    • Handball (mixed)
    • Bodybuilding (mixed)
    • Rugby (women)
    • Rugby (men)
    • Step (mixed)
    • Tennis (mixed) – minimum level required
    • Table tennis (mixed)
    • Volleyball (mixed)
    • Mountain bike (mixed)

    Students will have to contact the Athletics & Recreation Department (UAPS) to register for a specific sport at the beginning of the semester:
    • Go to the secretary of the U.A.P.S to choose a physical activity and sport, with a schedule that suits you (limited places, no registration by email or phone).
    • Return to the International Affairs office to validate your registration definitively.

    Courses take place 1h30 per week, attendance is mandatory (each absence is considered in the evaluation).

    Objectives:
    Allow students to integrate sport into their university curriculum at Dauphine, regardless of their department. Teachers in each activity will provide you with:
    • Theoretical content;
    • Physical content through the practice of a physical activity.

     

  • Company Culture

    Company Culture

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Learning outcomes
    Students will have the opportunity to structure their understanding of culture, and its increasing impact on organizational development with potential extension to mainstream society. They will acquire the ability to assess the incidence of cultural values on business orientations and analyze their correlation to management styles. Students will explore how culture is redefining today’s business horizon as well as societal lifestyles. They will also learn how they can contribute to company objectives through cultural values with a distinctive managerial outlook.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Assignments and grading
    Required case study preparation, class discussion participation and independent research.
    Graded 50% for collaborative group presentations and 50% for the individual final exam.

    The numerical grade distribution will dictate the final grade. The passing grade for a course is 10/20.


    Class participation: Active class participation – this is what makes classes lively and instructive. Come on time and prepared. Class participation is based on personal investment and quality of comments.

    Exam policy: In the exam, students will not be allowed to bring any document (except if allowed by the lecturer). Unexcused absences from exams or failure to submit cases will result in zero grades in the calculation of numerical averages. Exams are collected at the end of examination periods.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prerequisites
    International students are expected to have an initial awareness of culture in the field of business, and to have preliminary insight about what constitutes culture in companies, and in their products and services. They will endeavor to actively develop their understanding of the place of culture in management practices and to deepen their insight into the presence of culture in organizations and society. They agree to participate in class debates and conduct independent research on a topic pertaining to company culture.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Course description and objectives
    This course was designed for students destined for a career in international management and seeking to gain a personal understanding of the logics behind the cultural aspects of business practices. The teaching aims to broaden students’ perspectives, and enhance their ability to harness abstract cultural concepts and apply them to practical business contexts. This will deepen their understanding of the cultural dimension of business organizations in the light of related managerial considerations. Theoretical analysis and practical applications will prepare students to marketing management issues and organizational development choices. From the structuring of corporate identity to the design of brand image, students will learn about the cultural components of business activities. Teaching is done through thematic lectures, focused class discussions and simulated case study debates.

    Students will gain practical insight into what constitutes culture and will correlate this with the relevant managerial imperatives of business development. They will work on defining the parameters of their own management philosophy, expressing a unique cultural vision. They will also develop a professional skillset with cultural value orientations and the ability to focus business activity around cultural prerogatives. This aims to enhance their propensity to manage and develop company culture through selected key values.


    Course structure

    Presentation of course objectives and outline of learning requirements. Introduction to the presence of culture within business organizations and in products and services. Questions and answers session and correlation of student motivations to relevant course content.

    Development of student understanding of the nature of culture and its modes of retention, orientation and propagation. Overview of culture within society and the arts, and which aspects also pertain to the problem sets of economic process and business organizations.

    Analysis of cultural components entering into individual identification and social group processes. Culture will be examined as the bonding agent for multiple social actors. It will also be studied as creating and maintaining the reality construct used for their interactions.

    Review of the place of culture in philosophy, ethnology, social science and psychology. Outlook onto the historical evolution of culture within business and management science.

    1st case study focused on cultural perceptions and mandates as they correlate to socioeconomic contexts and value orientations. Discussion of situational assessments and the consequent implications for company interactions involving cultural considerations.

    Panorama of company cultures with analysis of their respective goals and orientations. Comparison of various cultural models and the evolution of company culture in contemporary businesses. Exploration of competing trends and future developments.

    Class analysis of a 2nd case with cultural engineering within a company. Discussion of the role of culture in management and limits of social engineering for business performance.

    Review of culture in relation to intellectual development and human or artificial intelligence. Culture in cognitive processes, civilizational structuring through culture, historical extension of cultural traditions and practices, in which today companies partake.

    The design of company culture from business models to policy-making. Study of the potential of culture to create company dynamics and alternative methods for value creation and performance achievement, correlation of company goals with cultural options.

    Student presentations of independent research on company culture topics.

    Student presentations of independent research on company culture topics.


    Final Exam
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliography

    Organizational Culture and Leadership. Edgard H. Schein - 1985 - Jossey-Bass.

    Living with Multiple Paradigms: The Case of Paradigm Interplay in Organizational Culture Studies. Schultz, Majken, and Mary Jo Hatch - 1996 - Academy of Management Review 21.2 (1996): 529–557.

    Impact of Organizational Culture on Organizational Performance: An Overview. F. Shahzad, A. Luqman, R. Khan & L. Shabbir - 2012 – I
    nterdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business 3 (9), 975 - 985

    Organizational Culture and its Impact on Employee Performance. R. Durgadevi & V. Shanmugan - 2017 -
    Journal of Public Health Research and Development, 8 (2), 315

    Connection Culture: The Competitive Advantage of Shared Identity, Empathy, and Understanding at Work. Michael Lee Stallard, Jason Pankau. Katharine P. Stallard - 2015 - Association for Talent Development.

    What Silicon Valley Gets Wrong (and Right) About Culture. Jay Rao - 2018 - Quartz at Work.

    Culture That Rocks: How to Revolutionize Your Company’s Culture. Jim Knight - 2014 - Knight Speaker LLC.


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  • Management Technologies

    Management Technologies

  • China-US Rivalry

    China-US Rivalry

  • Migrations in globalization

    Migrations in globalization

  • Culture and Practice of Entrepreneurship

    Culture and Practice of Entrepreneurship

  • Global Media: Fabrication, Circulations, Identities

    Global Media: Fabrication, Circulations, Identities

French as a Foreign Language

  • FLE Cours Elementaire

    FLE Cours Elementaire

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    A l’issu de ce cours, les élèves peuvent comprendre et utiliser une série de phrases ou d'expressions simples pour se décrire ou parler d'autres personnes, de leur vie, de leurs cours, ou de leur stage en termes très simples.
    Ils peuvent également participer à une conversation sur des sujets très familiers qui concernent les situations quotidiennes et des étudiants.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation

    2 tests en classe ;
    Participation en classe ;
    Devoirs personnels ;
    Examen final.de 2h

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Bibliographie

    Documents fournis par le professeur.
    Objectif exress 1, Hachette fle.
    Totem 1, Hachette
    Vocabulaire progressif du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    Communication progressive du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    DVD Totem, Alter Ego 1.
    Français des relations professionnelles.
    Grammaire progressive du français débutant. Cle.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Yes

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Ce cours aidera les étudiants à comprendre les codes de la société française et leur donnera les outils linguistiques pour participer à la vie étudiante et quotidienne en France. Cela nécessite une participation très active de leur part.
    L'objectif est de maîtriser les structures de base du français, favoriser l'autonomie dans les situations quotidiennes, acquérir des comportements et des savoir-faire, et adopter des réflexes interculturels.
    Les étudiants travailleront sur toutes les compétences requises (travail oral et écrit, compréhension orale et écrite, interaction) à l'aide de documents authentiques de différents types (documents audio, vidéos, articles, dialogues ...).
    La classe sera basée sur des travaux de communication et des simulations pour développer l'interaction orale. Ce travail sera soutenu par des exercices de grammaire et de phonétique en contexte.


    Plan du cours

    L’alphabet, épeler son nom.
    Prononciation et orthographe des sons. Les syllabes.
    Présenter un homme, une femme, sa famille.

    Se présenter : donner et demander des informations personnelles ou professionnelles simples.
    Donner et demander son adresse, son courriel, son numéro de téléphone.

    Etablir les contacts sociaux, présentation et usages.
    Rencontrer, saluer, remercier, s’excuser, dire au revoir.
    Le « tu » et le « vous »

    Faire connaissance à l’université, en stage d’entreprise.
    Assister à un évènement et échanger avec les participants.
    Parler de ses goûts, de ses préférences.
    Faire un commentaire positif, négatif.

    Les moyens de paiement.
    Payer et retirer de l’argent.
    Faire des achats, parler des quantités exprimées et non exprimées.
    Demander le prix.

    Aller au restaurant : réserver une table, commander un repas, poser des questions sur la carte, demander et vérifier l’addition.

    Décrire les activités de la vie quotidienne.
    Se situer dans l’espace et le temps.
    Parler de son emploi du temps.
    Organiser une journée de travail, donner des instructions et organiser un programme.

    Demander et donner des indications horaires.
    Réserver et acheter un billet de train, d’avion, une chambre d’hôtel.

    Prendre les transports en commun. Demander des renseignements à la station de métro, à la gare.
    S’orienter et orienter dans l’espace. Dire où l’on est, dire où l’on va.
    Parler des lieux, localiser, choisir et expliquer un itinéraire.
    Demander son chemin.
    Décrire un lieu.

    Proposer une activité, inviter, répondre à une invitation, exprimer l’incertitude.


    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    Documents fournis par le professeur.
    Objectif exress 1, Hachette fle.
    Totem 1, Hachette
    Vocabulaire progressif du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    Communication progressive du français, débutant complet, débutant. Cle.
    DVD Totem, Alter Ego 1.
    Français des relations professionnelles.
    Grammaire progressive du français débutant. Cle.
  • FLE A1: Cours Général

    FLE A1: Cours Général

    Ects : 6
  • FLE A2: Cours Général

    FLE A2: Cours Général

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    A la fin du semestre, l’étudiant sera à l’aise pour comprendre des phrases simples de la vie de tous les jours sur des sujets familiers. Il sera aisé pour lui de se faire comprendre et de défendre son point de vue lors d’une brève intervention. Il pourra décrire sa vie à Paris, son travail, ses activités actuelles et passées. Il parlera de ses souhaits, de ses obligations, donner ses impressions. Il sera aussi capable de se débrouiller dans une banque et chez le médecin.
    Il saura présenter un exposé devant le groupe et il sera à l’aise pour animer un débat.
    L’apprenant saura utiliser des expressions toutes faites et utiliser des connecteurs simples.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation
    Contrôle continu :

    Compréhension orale : 20%
    Compréhension écrite : 20%
    Exposé : 10%
    Participation orale : 20%
    Examen final :

    Production écrite : 30%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Ce cours s’adresse aux débutants en français L’étudiant doit déjà savoir communiquer dans des situations immédiates et urgentes. Il sait présenter ses proches, décrire des personnes ou des lieux. Il est capable de présenter ses activités de tous les jours. Il peut poser des questions et échanger des informations simples.
    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    Grammaire progressive du français, CLE International
    A Propos A2, PUG
    Totem A2, Hachette
    Jouer, communiquer, apprendre, Hachette.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FLE B1: Atelier d'écriture

    FLE B1: Atelier d'écriture

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    Tous ces points seront soigneusement adaptés aux descripteurs B1 du CECRL
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation

    Il vous sera demandé de produire un texte chaque semaine.
    L'assiduité et la participation sont essentielles.
    Le contrôle sera uniquement continu.

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Le niveau A2 doit avoir été validé pour intégrer ce cours.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Paris est-il une fête ?
    C'est à cette question, écho direct au titre français de l'œuvre autobiographique d'Hemingway, que l'on tentera de répondre ici, car il s'agit bien d'interroger l'expérience parisienne que vous allez vivre pendant ce semestre.
    Et puisque l'on écrit comme on lit, nous étudierons une sélection de textes littéraires d'époques, de formes, de styles variés qui constitueront ensuite, le cadre d'exercices d'écriture.
    Cet atelier est conçu comme :
    – une invitation à découvrir la beauté de la langue française par l'objet qu'est la littérature
    – une initiation au plaisir de la lecture pour soi en langue étrangère au travers d'une sélection de travaux, adaptés au niveau, d'écrivains reconnus pour la qualité de leur style
    – une analyse des outils linguistiques utilisés et leur mise en pratique (grammaire, conjugaison, vocabulaire, argumentation)
    – un travail de lecture à voix haute et de diction
    – une opportunité de construire le récit de sa propre expérience parisienne
    Tous ces points seront soigneusement adaptés aux descripteurs B1 du CECRL.


    Plan du cours
    Séance

    Sujet
    1 Raconter un événement au passé 1
    2 Raconter un événement au passé 2
    3 Décrire un lieu
    4 Décrire une action
    5 Caractériser une personne
    6 Exprimer ses sentiments
    7 Écrire une lettre personnelle
    8 Parler de ses projets
    9 Parler de ses rêves
    10 Dire son accord/désaccord
    11 Convaincre
    12 Séance récapitulative d'écriture collective

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FLE B1: Cinéma et société

    FLE B1: Cinéma et société

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir

    A la fin du cours, les étudiants peuvent s’attendre à maîtriser le vocabulaire du cinéma, des éléments essentiels du langage cinématographique et de l’histoire du cinéma, ainsi que des notions sur l’économie du cinéma aujourd’hui.
    La capacité d’analyser et interpréter un film ainsi que d’établir des comparaisons entre le cinéma en France et dans le pays des étudiants sera aussi partie prenante du cours, focaliser sur le développement des quatre compétences : compréhension orale et écrite, production orale et écrite de niveau B1.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation
    Les deux devoirs en classe consistent en des questions sur les dates et notions importantes vues en classe, le vocabulaire, la grammaire et les conjugaisons, ainsi qu’en une production écrite sur le thème du cinéma.

    Participation, devoirs (résumé de films français) : 20%
    Contrôle en classe : 20%
    Examen final de 2h : 30%
    “Dossier film” : 30%
    Le Dossier film est un travail réalisé en groupe de 3 ou 4 étudiants autour d’un film en langue française choisi par le groupe.

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Le cours s’adresse aux étudiants de niveau intermédiaire/indépendant.
    Aucune expérience dans l’étude du cinéma n’est exigée.
    Il est nécessaire d’avoir suivi le séminaire intensif ou justifier d’un niveau A2 minimum par une attestation

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    FLE-B1 Cinéma et Société est un cours de cinéma de français intermédiaire / indépendant sur le thème du cinéma qui a permet aux étudiants de maintenir et consolider leur niveau B1 en français tout en étudiant la culture française à travers le prisme du cinéma. Des visionnages individuels, des discussions et des recherches collectives alimentent la réflexion en classe tandis que des leçons sur l’histoire du cinéma et le langage cinématographique donnent une idée de la place du “7e art” dans l’histoire moderne et la culture contemporaine, dont il est un élément incontournable.

    En fin de semestre, les étudiants devront être capable d’écrire un essai sur le film analysé en classe, et de se référer aux notions d’histoire du cinéma et de langage cinématographique étudiées.
    Le niveau B1 en grammaire et conjugaison doit être maîtrisé.
    Les étudiants doivent également se montrer capable de collaborer et s’investir dans un projet de groupe autour d’un film, sa réception, son sens et son époque.


    Plan du cours

    Présentation du cours
    Vocabulaire du cinéma
    Histoire du cinéma : Le “Pré-cinéma”
    Les cinémas parisiens
    Histoire du cinéma : Les frères Lumière et la première séance de cinéma
    Histoire du cinéma : George Méliès, le magicien
    Grammaire/conjugaison de niveau B1 : le présent des verbes à 2 bases / Les pronoms compléments / les expressions suivies de l’infinitif
    Le langage cinématographique : les valeurs de cadre
    Grammaire/conjugaison de niveau B1 : le présent des verbes à 2 bases / Les pronoms compléments / les expressions suivies de l’infinitif
    Histoire du cinéma : Max Linder, la première vedette du cinéma
    Contrôle en classe
    « Dossier film », création des groupes et lancement du projet
    Le langage cinématographique : les raccords
    Projection de « Les Yeux sans visage » George Franju, France-Italie, 1960
    ou «Fanny », Marcel Pagnol, France, 1932
    Analyse du film étudié
    Langage cinématographique : les mouvements de caméra
    L’économie du cinéma en France
    Grammaire : révision
    Examen final

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    « Histoire du cinéma français » Jean-Pierre Jeancolas, Armand Colin, 2011.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FL1 B1: Paris Cité des arts

    FL1 B1: Paris Cité des arts

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    La méthode pour analyser l’art représente la capacité d’observer, de poser des questions et de justifier une interprétation de n’importe quelle œuvre d’art. Après le semestre, les étudiants seront capables de commencer une interprétation (le message, l’idée, l’intention d’une œuvre), basée sur une observation générale et détaillée. Ils seront capables de la faire en français, en utilisant un vocabulaire spécifique et des références à l’histoire de l’art, ainsi qu’une large base de connaissances sur la ville de Paris.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation

    Essai n°1 20%
    Essai n°2 20%
    Présentation en groupe 20%
    Examen Final 40%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Pour participer à ce cours, il faut posséder un niveau B1 à l’écrit et à l’oral et chercher à développer activement ses compétences en français, à travers la lecture régulière et l’utilisation des médias en français. Il faut aimer poser des questions, analyser, vouloir comprendre et décrypter seul et en groupe. La participation en classe et le travail collectif sont impératifs. Il n’y a pas besoin de connaître l’art ou les artistes, mais il est nécessaire de vouloir plonger dans l’histoire de l’art et des mouvements artistiques du passé pour comprendre ceux du présent.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Nous étudions dans ce cours la place de Paris dans l’histoire de l’art, et plus précisément nous enquêtons sur l’existence de trois grands musées, dans l’ordre chronologique : le musée du Louvre, le musée d’Orsay et le Centre Pompidou.
    Pour les étudiants étrangers à Dauphine, ces musées sont connus et réputés, mais ce qui les sépare n’est pas très clair : est-ce une raison historique ? Chronologique ? Des mouvements artistiques différents ? Une volonté politique ?

    Objectifs:
    Les objectifs de cette classe sont de développer les capacités à interpréter l’art aujourd’hui, en comprenant les changements majeurs qui ont eu lieu au XIXème siècle, particulièrement lorsque Paris était la ville des profondes et radicales évolutions artistiques.
    Les activités dans la classe permettront aux étudiants de construire une méthode et de l’utiliser, pour observer, analyser et interpréter des œuvres comme des peintures, sculptures et bâtiments.
    La différence entre les 3 musées d’art principaux à Paris est une référence constante pour devenir capable de comprendre les connexions d’une œuvre d’art avec la société, les mouvements passés ou futurs, and la situation de l’art aujourd’hui.
    Les étudiants seront amenés à maîtriser le français oral de niveau B1 pour progresser au long du semestre au niveau B2 (comprendre et utiliser les registres de langues, les expressions, les phrases complexes). Ils utiliseront chaque semaine le français pour converser avec le professeur et débattre entre étudiants, par groupe ou en classe complète. Le français écrit sera utilisé à chaque séance pour des prises de notes, questionnaires, et lors de la rédaction des 2 essais et de l’examen final. A la fin du semestre, les compétences écrites sont celles de la description, de l’argumentation, de l’analyse et de l’élaboration d’idées personnelles.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    GOMBRICH, E.H., Histoire de l’Art, Phaidon, 2001.
    ARASSE, D., On n’y voit rien : Descriptions, Gallimard, 2006.
    ARASSE, D. Histoires de Peintures, Gallimard, 2006.
    ANTOINE-ANDERSEN, Véronique, L’Art pour comprendre le Monde, Actes Sud, 2011.

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FLE B2: Les Enjeux de l'actualité

    FLE B2: Les Enjeux de l'actualité

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    A l’issue de ce cours, l’étudiant aura acquis tant sur le plan argumentatif que culturel les outils lui permettant de participer pleinement à des conversations sur des thèmes de société avec des locuteurs natifs. Il sera capable d’exprimer et de défendre des points de vue.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation
    L’étudiant sera évalué par des tests de connaissance de l’actualité (en classe), des commentaires ou dossiers (en classe et à la maison) et sa participation à chaque séance. Une participation active de chaque étudiant est absolument nécessaire au bon déroulement de ce cours.

    Tests en classe 20%
    Travaux à la maison 25%
    Participation 25%
    Examen final 30%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Pour pouvoir assister à ce cours de niveau B2, les étudiants doivent être capables de comprendre des articles relativement complexes de la presse française et de débattre à propos de thèmes d’actualité. Ils doivent avoir une certaine maîtrise des outils de l’argumentation.
    Les étudiants devront attester de leur niveau soit par une attestation de niveau B1 minimum ou avoir suivi le séminaire intensif en début de semestre.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Dans ce cours intitulé « Les enjeux de l’actualité française », les étudiants liront très régulièrement la presse et analyseront d’un point de vue interculturel les thèmes qui font l’actualité en France. L’enseignant leur fournira les outils linguistiques et culturels qui leur permettront de commenter l’actualité française. Le cours abordera à travers l’actualité, les grands thèmes de civilisation française. L’actualité française comprend non seulement ce qui se passe en France mais aussi ce que les médias français choisissent de mettre dans l’actualité.

    L’objectif de ce cours est de donner aux étudiants, à travers l’analyse et le commentaire de l’actualité française, les outils linguistiques et culturels leur permettant de développer leur expression orale (lors des débats en classe) et écrite (dans des commentaires d’article).

     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    Lecture régulière de la presse française.

    MyCourse

    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Oui
  • FLE B2: Sémiotique du marketing

    FLE B2: Sémiotique du marketing

    Ects : 6
    Volume horaire : 36
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    Comme décrit dans l’aperçu, les étudiants seront capables d’utiliser les outils sémiotiques pour aiguiser leurs compétences de réception comme de production à propos de documents marketing, devenant ainsi de plus en plus conscients de ce qui est sous-jacent dans les signes marketing tels que publicités TV ou affiches, mais également emails promotionnels ou tout type de documents qu’ils seront eux-mêmes susceptibles de produire.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation

    Test de mi-semestre 20%
    Exposés en groupe 20%
    Participation 20%
    Test final 40%

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
     
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Être classé dans le groupe 4 dans le test de début de semestre
    Pour participer à ce cours, il faut posséder un niveau B2 à l’écrit et à l’oral et chercher à développer activement ses compétences en français, à travers la lecture régulière et l’utilisation des médias en français. Il faut aimer poser des questions, analyser, vouloir comprendre et décrypter seul et en groupe. La participation en classe et le travail collectif sont impératifs.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours

    Contenu thématique

    Extraits d’interviews radio et vidéo de spécialistes de la sémiotique, de la publicité et du marketing.
    Publicités TV et web, extraits d’émissions consacrées à la publicité.
    Extraits d’articles de presse spécialisée, de textes théoriques de références, analyse de textes publicitaires et de supports communicationnels
    Débats autour des documents analysés
    Exposés : présentation des résultats de recherche utilisant les outils sémiotiques
    Rédaction d’essais

    Contenu linguistique
    (Selon besoins)

    Sociolinguistique : repérer et utiliser les différents niveaux de langue
    Vocabulaire et actes de parole de la description d'image
    Donner des conseils, suggérer ou donner des consignes : le conditionnel et le subjonctif
    Proposer une approche interculturelle avec le comparatif et le superlatif
    Reformuler : les connecteurs logiques, les pronoms personnels, la concordance des temps au discours indirect

    Objectifs

    Développer la pratique orale et écrite du français autour des questions posées par la sémiotique : aborder autrement le marketing, la publicité et la communication
    Sensibiliser les étudiants aux outils d’analyse et de stratégie issus de la sémiotique, en contexte francophone, dans une perspective interculturelle.
    Décoder les systèmes de valeurs cachés derrière les signes, ainsi que le nouvel environnement que représentent Paris et la France pour des étudiants étrangers.
    Les étudiants feront le lien concrètement entre les aspects théoriques, leur parcours et leurs projets professionnels.

    Plan du cours

    Prise de conscience de l'omniprésence des signes : le tee shirt de Jean-Marie Klinkenberg, l'histoire de Monsieur Sigma (Umberto Eco).
    Analyse de logos célèbres et de l'étude fondatrice de Roland Barthes de la publicité Panzani.
    Extrait vidéo promotionnelle de l'agence Sémiopolis: quelle peut être la place de la sémiotique dans l'entreprise?

    10 définitions du « signe » par Umberto Eco
    Les théoriciens du signe, les grandes figures de la sémiotique (et les notions qu'ils ont développées) et ses différents champs d'application.

    Exemples d'applications : l'Histoire de « Je suis Charlie », extrait d'entretien vidéo de Barthes présentant « Mythologies », affiche de campagne présidentielle de François Hollande en 2012: présentation des outils d'analyse sémiotique.
    Exemple d'offre d'analyse sémiotique « appliquée » : brochure de l'agence « Capcom »

    Exemple du changement de logo « Care » :
    Sens dénoté et sens connoté en typographie.
    De l’interaction entre le texte et l’image : l’effet de double ancrage
    Exemples de situations d’incongruence et de congruence typographique
    Exemples où la typographie détermine le sens dénoté du mot
    Résultats de l’analyse de contenu lexical
    Présentation du reste du semestre, des tests et exposés.


    TEST 1 (Contrôle de connaissances)
    Exploitation pédagogique de la vidéo : « Comprendre les bases du marketing » (Agence Global-brandings.com)
    Quels sont les « points de contact » avec la sémiotique ? Où est-elle pertinente ?

    Correction du test 1
    Etude de la notion de « code couleurs »
    Focus sur les banques françaises :
    Etude de cas : l'évolution du logo du Crédit du Nord en 1986

    Introduction du carré sémiotique autour de l'évolution des publicités Citroën
    Elargissement à la publicité en général et aux comportements consommateurs.

    Application du carré sémiotique à la communication de la grande distribution
    Consignes pour les exposés et réflexion sur le choix des problématiques et documents.
    Exploitation pédagogique de la vidéo « la sémiologie appliquée aux emailings », récapitulation des outils sémiotiques désormais à disposition des étudiants.
    Atelier : « consolidation » des projets d’exposés : problématique, carrés sémiotiques, choix des documents

    Exposés + Focus sur la notion de « marque » envisagée à travers la sémiotique, autour de la vidéo « la sémiotique et les marques » de Nathalie Veg-Sala et du chapitre du Mercator sur le sujet.

    Exposés + le « storytelling » : analyse de publicités web et TV de grandes marques, focus sur l'histoire du carnet « Moleskine ».

    Examen final
     

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    BARTHES, Roland. Mythologies. Paris : Éditions du Seuil, 1957. Collection Points. ISBN 2-02-000585-9
    ECO, Umberto, Le Signe. (Segno : Milan : Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, 1980) Bruxelles : Editions Labor, 1988, Livre de Poche, Collection « Biblio Essais ». ISBN 978-2-253-06094-9
    FLOCH, Jean-Marie, Sémiotique, Marketing et Communication », Paris, PUF, 1990. Collection « Formes sémiotiques ». ISBN 22407230-12-01
    FRAENKEL, Béatrice, LEGRIS-DESPORTES, Christiane, Entreprise et sémiologie- analyser le sens pour maîtriser l’action. Paris, Dunod, 1999, Collection Marketing-Communication, ISBN 9782100037247
    KLINKENBERG, Jean-Marie, Précis de sémiotique générale, De Boeck S.A. Larcier, 1996. Point Seuil-Collection Essais. ISBN 2-02036703-3

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Non
  • FLE B2: French Touch - Langue et Culture

    FLE B2: French Touch - Langue et Culture

    Ects : 6
  • FLE C1: Le Français des Affaires

    FLE C1: Le Français des Affaires

    Ects : 6
  • Séminaire Intensif de Français Janvier

    Séminaire Intensif de Français Janvier

    Ects : 3
    Volume horaire : 24
    Compétence à acquérir :
    Compétences à acquérir
    A la fin du séminaire, les étudiants ont découvert ou consolidé leurs bases en langue française. Ces bases leur permettent de mieux appréhender leur semestre ou année en France.
    Mode de contrôle des connaissances :
    Mode d’évaluation et notation

    Les enseignants évaluent le niveau oral des étudiants tout au long de la semaine
    Examen final de 2h lors de la dernière séance

    La distribution numérique des notes dictera la note finale. Le cours est validé à partir de 10/20.


    Participation en classe : Participation active en classe - c'est ce qui rend les classes vivantes et instructives. Venez à l'heure et préparé. La participation en classe est basée sur la qualité des commentaires, pas sur la quantité.

    Politique d'examen : Lors de l'examen, les étudiants ne seront autorisés à apporter aucun document (sauf si autorisé par le professeur). Les absences non justifiées aux examens ou le défaut de fournir un justificatif entraîneront des notes nulles dans le calcul des moyennes numériques. Les examens sont recueillis à la fin des périodes d'examen.
    Pré-requis obligatoires :
    Prérequis
    Les étudiants doivent passer un test de langue en ligne ou attester de leur niveau en présentant un certificat.

    Description du contenu de l'enseignement :
    Descriptif et objectifs du cours
    Les étudiants travailleront toutes les compétences (production orale, production écrite, compréhension orale, compréhension écrite, interaction) à l’aide de documents authentiques de différentes natures (documents sonores, vidéos, articles…).
    Le séminaire se déroule sur 5 demi-journées, à raison de 4 heures par jour. Des exercices sont également à faire entre les cours à raison de 4h en ligne via la plateforem MyCourse. Un examen final permet de valider le niveau de l’étudiant.
    Le séminaire se déroule en groupe de 15 étudiants maximum, par niveau allant de débutant jusqu’à C1.

    Ce séminaire intensif a pour objectif de préparer les étudiants à leur semestre à Paris, par un apprentissage du français adapté à leur niveau. Débutants ou avancés, ils apprendront à communiquer, à l’écrit comme à l’oral, dans des situations du quotidien, en allant de la présentation au débat d’idées.
    Ce cours leur permettra de comprendre les codes de la société française et leur donnera les moyens linguistiques de prendre part à la vie quotidienne en France.

    Bibliographie, lectures recommandées
    Bibliographie

    Les documents seront fournis par les enseignants

    MyCourse
    Ce cours est sur MyCourse :
    Yes

Formation année universitaire 2020 - 2021 - sous réserve de modification